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Air Products receives CAD 475m for Alberta H2 complex

Air Products has proceeded with EPC and the marketing of hydrogen from the complex, following the September signing of an offtake agreement with Imperial Oil.

Canadian federal and provincial governments have dedicated CAD 475m in project funding for Air Products’ 165m SCFD hydrogen production complex in Alberta, according to a press release.

Air Products will receive CAD 300m from the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF). The project funding specifically comes from the Net-Zero Accelerator Program targeting industrial decarbonization.

Under separate agreements, more than CAD 160m will from the Alberta Petrochemicals Incentive Program (APIP) and CAD 15m from the Emissions Reduction Alberta’s Shovel-Ready Challenge.

The announcement marks the completion of MOU agreements referenced in June 2021 when Air Products initially announced the multi-billion-dollar plan to build the net-zero hydrogen energy complex.

Since the initial facility announcement, Air Products has proceeded with EPC and marketing the hydrogen. In September the company announced an offtake agreement with Imperial Oil for approximately 50% of the output. That agreement saw the company increase its facility investment from CAD 1.3bn to CAD 1.6bn.

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CarbonQuest and Daroga Power partner on C&I fuel cell and carbon capture

The partnership is providing clients with financing for the upfront capital necessary to purchase their fuel cell and carbon capture systems.

CarbonQuest, a carbon capture technology provider supporting the onsite decarbonization of buildings, campus settings and other facilities, and Daroga Power, a ​​sustainable infrastructure and distributed generation developer, have entered a partnership to bring a low-carbon fuel cell solution to the commercial and industrial sectors in the U.S. and Canada.

Under the terms of the partnership, Daroga Power will develop, install and operate fuel cells that can power industrial facilities, buildings, and campus settings without interruptions and without the need for batteries, according to a news release.

CarbonQuest’s Distributed Carbon Capture™ system will be used in conjunction with the fuel cells to capture the systems’ generated carbon before it is emitted to the atmosphere. CarbonQuest will also sell the captured carbon to industrial users.

To hasten adoption, the partnership is providing clients with financing for the upfront capital necessary to purchase the systems. Daroga and CarbonQuest will also provide long-term maintenance support for the fuel cells and carbon capture components.

Given the power capacity limitations of the New York regional grid, along with delayed renewable interconnection, a fuel cell + carbon capture solution offers both short- and long-term benefits to many types of energy users with on-site, base-load power that is also low carbon.

CarbonQuest and Daroga aim to sign on approximately 20 projects in the next 12 months, which will generate an anticipated 100,000 metric tons per year of recycled, liquified Sustainable CO2.

After being captured by CarbonQuest’s system, the liquid CO2 will be sold to various off-takers across the Northeastern U.S. Given the severe constraint of CO2 supply in the region, CarbonQuest’s Sustainable CO2™ offers a unique solution for CO2 users while also supporting the growth of new carbon-based industries.

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Hydrogen tech firm looking for distribution partners with eye on Series B

A Florida-based hydrogen technology company is hoping to find strategic partners with distribution networks as part of its impending Series A capital raise, with an eye on a much larger Series B later.

BoMax Hydrogen, the Florida-based hydrogen production technology firm, is searching for strategic partners with distribution networks as part of its soon-to-launch Series A capital raise, CEO Chris Simuro said in an interview.

BoMax, founded in 2014 and headquartered in Orlando, will launch a $15m Series A on November 1, Simuro said. The company has hired Taylor DeJongh to run the process, as recently reported by ReSource.

Greenberg Traurig is the company’s law firm, Simuro said. They use a regional accountant in Florida.

Taylor DeJongh is looking for three to five investors to put in between $3m and $5m each. BoMax is in discussions with French container shipping company CMA-CGM as a potential investor, he said.

“We are truly searching for distribution partners,” Simuro said, adding that company doesn’t envision itself touching the end-use customer.

The Series A funds should provide up to 24 months of runway and expand the company’s manufacturing capacity, Simuro said. A follow-on Series B capital raise will likely be $100m or more.

BoMax has raised some $5m to date, including from state government aerospace economic development agency Space Florida.

Funds from the Series A will be used to make a beta prototype, scale operations at the company’s labs in Orlando and prepare for commercial production.

No electrolysis

The company touts a novel technology making hydrogen from visible light without the need for solar electrolysis, according to a pre-teaser marketing document seen by ReSource. An alpha prototype has been awarded by the US Department of Energy.

Requiring a larger footprint, electrolysis can ultimately produce 38 liters of hydrogen per hour per square meter, Simuro said. BoMax believes it can reach 50 liters per hour in six months time.

“It replicates how hydrogen is made in the natural world,” Simuro said. “In order to do this globally, we are going to need partners.”

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Lummus and Biohydrogen Technologies form blue H2 partnership

A cross continental partnership between UK and US entities is meant to develop and deploy blue hydrogen production technologies.

Lummus Technology and Biohydrogen Technologies have an agreement to develop synthesis gas reactor technology to produce blue hydrogen, according to a news release.

Lummus’ Green Circle business unit will provide Biohydrogen Technologies hydrogen and synthesis gas plant design, reactor scale-up and equipment supply.

“This technology is an economically attractive solution to address the large-scale production of blue hydrogen,” the release states.

The partnership is meant to allow bulk hydrogen production from natural gas.

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Low-carbon tech company targeting hydrogen at 35 cents per kilogram

A North Carolina net-zero solutions company has plans to raise capital and is scouting for a location in the US Gulf Coast for its first clean hydrogen production facility.

8 Rivers Capital, the North Carolina net zero solutions company and technology commercialization platform, will need to raise capital and is scouting for a location in the US Gulf Coast for its first clean hydrogen production facility, Chief Technology Officer and Co-founder Bill Brown said on the sidelines of CERAWeek in Houston.

Brown declined to elaborate on the capital raise, but said he is well connected to finance from previous roles he held at Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. The company received a $100m investment from South Korea-based SK Group last March.

8 Rivers has technology for power generation, hydrogen production, gas processing, and direct air capture. Through its involvement with affiliate Net Power, 8 Rivers has developed the Allam-Fetvedt Cycle, a power cycle that uses the oxy-combustion of carbon-based fuels and a high-pressure CO2 fluid in a highly recuperated cycle that captures emissions. Net Power was recently acquired in a SPAC deal with Rice Acquisition Corp. II, which valued the company at $1.459bn.

In hydrogen, 8 Rivers has developed 8RH2, a process to make hydrogen from natural gas that produces lower emissions and higher efficiencies, according to its website.

8 Rivers announced in November that it signed an MoU with Japan-based JX Nippon to evaluate the US Gulf Coast for “commercial-scale deployment of 8 Rivers technologies across ammonia and other net-zero projects, including potential projects using CO2-rich natural gas.”

Hydrogen at 35 cents?

Brown isn’t too concerned with the source, or color, of hydrogen. He’s much more concerned with the price per kilo, and says his goal is to make low or zero-carbon-intensity hydrogen without concern for its provenance.

“If we can get hydrogen at 35 cents, you would never build a new power plant, because you’ve got hydrogen cheap enough to use a traditional hydrogen turbine,” Brown said. “I can make the cheapest hydrogen from methane, or coal for that matter. I can’t make it from electricity without subsidy.”

Hydrogen at 35 cents is USD 3 per MMBtu, making it competitive with gas.

“One-dollar hydrogen, to me, is worthless,” he said. “Let’s face it, right now, we have one-dollar hydrogen in the world, not clean, but we have seen the full demand already.”

“8 Rivers does not want to be the company that says ‘here, take my technology,’” Brown said. “8 Rivers wants to be the company that says ‘come to us and we will give you the cheapest hydrogen and we’re agnostic as to where it came from, but we can tell you it’s green.’”

Target markets include customers that are blending hydrogen, Brown said. With USD 50bn of hydrogen assets already deployed in the US, he’s not concerned about offtake.

“It’s the system,” Brown said. “The system is the offtake.”

For ammonia, island nations in transition, commercial shipping and coal replacement all present large potential markets, Brown said. If ammonia can be produced at USD 100 per ton, it will be more competitive than coal as an export fuel.

But Brown is adamant that hydrogen blending in existing infrastructure presents the best and most immediate use for hydrogen.

“All it takes is offtake,” Brown said. “The easiest thing to do with hydrogen is not converting it to ammonia to ship it overseas with some supply contract, the easiest thing to do is put it in a pipeline.”

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Denbury to transport CO2 for Louisiana blue methanol project

A subsidiary of Denbury Inc. will transport and store CO2 for a planned blue methanol plant in Lake Charles, Louisiana.

Denbury Carbon Solutions has executed a 20-year definitive agreement to provide CO2 transportation and storage services to Lake Charles Methanol in association with that company’s planned 3.6 MMPTA blue methanol project, according to a press release.

LCM’s facility will be located along the Calcasieu River near Lake Charles, Louisiana, approximately 10 miles from Denbury’s Green Pipeline.

The facility is designed to utilize Topsoe’s SynCORTM technology to convert natural gas into hydrogen which will be synthesized into methanol while incorporating carbon capture and sequestration.

The process is anticipated to deliver more than 500 million kilograms of hydrogen per year as a feedstock to produce the 3.6 MMTPA of blue methanol.

LCM is finalizing its major permits to begin construction. The project is expected to reach a Final Investment Decision in 2023 with first production anticipated in 2027.

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Waste-to-energy company interviewing advisors for strategic capital raise

Vancouver-based Klean Industries plans to run a process to raise between $250m – $500m of capital to deploy into projects, some of which would use green hydrogen to upgrade recovered fuel and pyrolysis oils.

Waste-to-energy specialist Klean Industries is interviewing financial advisors and planning to run a process to find investors for a strategic capital raise.

The Vancouver-based company is seeking to raise between $250m – $500m in a minority stake sale that would value the company around $1bn, Klean CEO Jesse Klinkhamer said in an interview.

Klean had previously intended to list on the NASDAQ exchange but those plans were nixed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, he said. The company still plans to list publicly in 2024 or 2025.

Proceeds from a capital raise now would be used to “rapidly deploy” into the projects that Klean is advancing around the globe, Klinkhamer said.

For one of those projects – a flagship tire pyrolysis plant in Boardman, Oregon – Klean is raising non-recourse debt to finance construction, the executive said. Klinkhammer declined to name the advisor for the project financing but said news would be out soon and added that the company has aligned itself with infrastructure funds willing to provide non-recourse debt for the facility.

The Boardman project, which is expected to cost roughly $135m, is an expansion of an existing site where Klean will use its advanced thermal conversion technology to recover fuel oil, steel, and refined carbon black from recycled tires. The end products are comparable to virgin commodities with the exception of being more cost-effective with a lower carbon footprint.

“A lot of what we do is of paramount interest to a lot of the ESG-focused infrastructure investors that are focused on assets that tick all the boxes,” Klinkhamer said, noting the consistent output of the waste-to-energy plants that Klean is building along with predictable prices for energy sourced from renewable power.

Klean has also partnered with H2Core Systems, a maker of containerized green hydrogen production plants, and Enapter, an electrolyzer manufacturer. The company will install a 1 MW electrolyzer unit at the Boardman facility, with the green hydrogen used to upgrade recovered fuel oil and pyrolysis oil into e-fuels that meet California’s Low Carbon Fuels Standards.

“We were exploring how we could improve the quality of the tire pyrolysis oil so that it could enter the LCFS market in California,” he said, “because there are significant carbon credits and tax incentives associated with the improved product.”

The company received proposals from industrial gas companies to bring hydrogen to the Boardman facility that were not feasible, and Klean opted for producing electrolytic hydrogen on site in part due to the abundance of low-cost hydroelectric power and water from the nearby Columbia River.

Addressable market

Discussing Klean’s addressable market for waste-to-energy projects, Klinkhamer points to Japan as an example of a comparable “mature” market.

Japan, an island nation of 126 million people, has built roughly 5,000 resource recovery, waste-to-energy plants of various scopes and designations, he notes. For comparison, the United Kingdom – another island nation of 67 million people – has just 20 waste-to-energy plants.

“The opportunity for waste-to-energy in the UK alone is mind boggling,” he said. “There are a thousand opportunities of scope and scale. Nevermind you’ve got an aging, outdated electrical infrastructure, limited landfills, landfill taxes rising – a tsunami of issues, plus the ESG advent.”

A similar opportunity exists in North America, he noted, where there are around 100 waste-to-energy plants for 580 million people. The company is working on additional tire, plastic, and waste-to-energy projects in North America, and also has projects in Australia and Europe.

Hydrogen could be the key to advancing more projects: waste-to-energy plants have typically been hamstrung by a reliance on large utilities to convert energy generated from waste into electricity, which is in turn dependent on transmission. But the plants could instead produce hydrogen, which can be more easily and cost effectively distributed, Klinkhamer said.

“There is now an opportunity to build these same plants, but rather than rely on the electrical side of things where you’re dealing with a utility, to convert that energy into hydrogen and distribute it to the marketplace,” he added.

Hydrogen infrastructure

Klinkhamer says the company is also examining options for participating in a network of companies that could transform the logistics for bringing feedstock to the Boardman facility and taking away the resulting products.

The company has engaged in talks with long-haul truckers as well as refining companies and industrial gas providers about creating a network of hydrogen hubs – akin to a “Tesla network” – that would support transportation logistics.

“It made sense for us to look at opportunities for moving our feedstock via hydrogen-powered vehicles, and also have refueling stations and hydrogen production plants that we build in North America,” he said.

Klean would need seven to 12 different hubs to supply its transportation network, Klinkhamer estimates, while the $350m price tag for the infrastructure stems from the geographic reach of the hubs as well as the sheer volume of hydrogen required for fueling needs.

“With the Inflation Reduction Act, the U.S. has set itself up to be the lowest-cost producer of hydrogen in the world, which will really spur the development of hydrogen logistics for getting hydrogen out,” he said. “And to get to scale, it’s going to require some big investments.”

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