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Analysis: Premium for clean hydrogen unlikely

A group of hydrogen offtakers say they have every intention of decarbonizing their fuel intake, but barring the implementation of a carbon-pricing mechanism, paying a premium for it is unrealistic.

Passage of the Inflation Reduction Act ignited investor interest in the global market for clean hydrogen and derivatives like ammonia and methanol, but offtake demand would be better characterized as a flicker.

And while many questions about the nascent market for green hydrogen remain unanswered, one thing is clear: offtakers seem uninterested in paying a “green premium” for clean fuels.

That doesn’t mean offtakers aren’t interested in using clean fuels – quite the opposite. As many large industrial players worldwide consider decarbonization strategies, hydrogen and its derivatives must play a significant role.

Carbon pricing tools such as the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism in Europe could introduce a structural pricing premium for clean products. And industry participants have called for carbon levies to boost clean fuels, most recently Trafigura, which released a white paper today advocating for a carbon tax on fossil-based shipping fuels.

But the business case for clean fuels by itself presents an element of sales risk for potential offtakers, who would have to try to pass on higher costs to customers. Even so, there is an opportunity for offtakers to make additional sales and gain market share using decarbonization as a competitive advantage while seeking to share costs and risks along the value chain.

“It’s a very difficult sell internally to say we’re going to stop using natural gas and pay more for a different fuel,” said Jared Elvin, renewable energy lead at consumer goods company Kimberly-Clark. “That is a pickle.”

Needing clean fuels to reach net zero

Heavy-duty and long-haul transportation is viewed as a clear use case for clean fuels, but customers for those fuels are highly sensitive to price.

“We’re very demand focused, very customer focused,” said Ashish Bhakta, zero emission business development manager at Trillium, a company that owns the Love’s Travel Shop brand gas stations. “That leads us to be fuel-agnostic.”

Trillium is essentially an EPC for fueling stations with an O&M staff for maintenance, Bhakta said.

As many customers consider their own transitions to zero-emissions, they are thinking through EV as well as hydrogen, he said. Hydrogen is considered better for range, fueling speed and net-payload for mobility, all of which bodes well for the clean fuels industry.

One sticking point is price, he said. Shippers are highly sensitive to changes in fuel cost – and asking them to pay a premium doesn’t go far.

Alessandra Klockner, manager of decarbonization and energy solutions manager at Brazilian mining giant Vale, said her employer is seeking partnerships with manufacturers, particularly in steel, to decarbonize its component chain.

In May Vale and French direct reduced iron (DRI) producer GravitHy signed an MoU to jointly evaluate the construction of a DRI production plant using hydrogen as a feedstock in Fos-sur-Mer, France. The company also has steel decarbonization agreements in Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Oman.

In the near term, 60% of Vale’s carbon reductions will come from prioritizing natural gas, Klockner said. But to reach net zero, the company will need clean hydrogen.

“There’s not many options for this route, to reach net zero,” she said. “Clean hydrogen is pretty much the only solution that we see.”

Elvin, of Kimberly-Clark, noted that his company is developing its own three green hydrogen projects in the UK, meant to supply for local use at the source.

“We’re currently design-building our third hydrogen fueling facility for public transit,” he said. “We’re basically growing and learning and getting ready for this transition.”

The difficulty of a “green premium

The question of affordability persists in the clean fuels space.

“There are still significant cost barriers,” said Cihang Yuan, a senior program officer for the World Wildlife Fund, an NGO that has taken an active role in promoting clean fuels. “We need more demand-side support to really overcome that barrier and help users to switch to green hydrogen.”

Certain markets will have to act as incubators for the sector, and cross-collaboration from production to offtake can help bring prices down, according to Elvin. Upstream developers should try to collaborate early on with downstream users to “get the best bang for your buck” upstream, as has been happening thus far, he added.

Risk is prevalently implied in the space and must be shared equitably between developers, producers and offtakers, he said.

“We’ve all got to hold hands and move forward in this, because if one party is not willing to budge on any risk and not able to look at the mitigation options then they will fail,” he said. “We all have to share some sort of risk in these negotiations.”

The mining and steel industries have been discussing the concept of a green premium, Klockner said. Green premiums have actually been applied in some instances, but in very niche markets and small volumes.

“Who is going to absorb these extra costs?” she said. “Because we know that to decarbonize, we are going to have an extra cost.”

The final clients are not going to accept a green premium, she said. To overcome this, Vale plans to work alongside developers to move past the traditional buyer-and-seller model and into a co-investment strategy.

“We know those developers have a lot of challenges,” she said. “I think we need to exchange those challenges and build the business case together. That’s the only way that I see for us to overcome this cost issue.”

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Navigator Gas makes clean ammonia devcap investment

London-based Navigator received approval for a $2.5m development capital investment into a Gulf Coast clean ammonia project.

Navigator Gas said this week that it had received board approval to make a development capital investment into a clean ammonia export project in the U.S. Gulf Coast.

In its 1Q24 earnings release, the company stated the following:

On May 14, 2024, the Company’s Board of Directors approved a $2.5 million investment in an early-stage clean ammonia export project in the U.S. Gulf coast area. The Company expects to make its first monetary contribution to the project in the second or third quarter of 2024, and we will provide more details as the project develops. This initial investment is development capital, and subject to board approval, we also expect to make larger investments at FID and during the construction phase of the project towards a terminal and ship-shore logistics.

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Bloom Energy partners for expansion in Spain and Portugal

The California-based company has teamed with Telam Partners, a leading senior advisory firm specialized in the financing and market entry of energy, infrastructure, and technology projects.

Bloom Energy has teamed with Telam Partners, a leading senior advisory firm specialized in the financing and market entry of energy, infrastructure, and technology projects, to expand Bloom’s footprint into Spain and Portugal, according to a press release.

The two companies will market and deploy the Bloom Electrolyzer, as well as Bloom’s Energy Servers, supporting customers with solutions that can efficiently meet their energy security needs and green hydrogen demand.

“Business and political leaders are looking for clean technologies and energy solutions,” said Tim Schweikert, senior managing director of International Business Development, Bloom Energy Inc. “Bloom is now engaged to address these priorities in Spain and Portugal. Telam is a partner of choice, supporting Bloom’s long-term commitment to the Iberian Peninsula and to respond promptly to green transition policies and environmental imperatives.”

“At Telam we are excited to be able to work with the solid oxide fuel cell leader on the very important and urgent challenge of transitioning towards renewable energy,” said Jaime Malet, CEO of Telam Partners. “We are convinced that Spain and Portugal, thanks to an abundance of wind and solar resources, are among the clearest candidates to lead the production of green hydrogen in Europe.”

In line with Spanish and Portuguese objectives to become global green hydrogen hubs, Telam and Bloom will market Bloom’s solid oxide electrolyzer. With impressive efficiency confirmed in testing at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Labs, the Bloom Electrolyzer provides hydrogen with low cost of ownership. Further, the Bloom Electrolyzer is well suited for large-scale installations, as well as projects such as ammonia and renewable fuels synthesis, which can be integrated with the electrolyzer.

Telam and Bloom will also market Bloom’s highly efficient fuel cell Energy Server™ to decarbonize port activities when ships are at berth. Bloom’s fuel-flexible technology, which can operate on natural gas, biogas or hydrogen, produces electricity without combustion and reduces carbon emissions compared to the auxiliary diesel gensets usually used for shore power.

This represents Bloom Energy’s first deal for the Iberian Peninsula. It confirms Bloom’s commitment to the European market, after announcing the installation of its energy platform at Ferrari’s Italian plant and a strategic partnership for the Italian market with the engineering, procurement and construction company CEFLA in 2022.

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Macquarie invests in Dutch SAF developer SkyNRG

By 2030 SkyNRG aims to build its dedicated SAF facilities in Europe and the US under offtake arrangements with strategic partners.

Macquarie Asset Management will support the growth of sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) with an initial investment of up to €175m in SkyNRG via the Macquarie GIG Energy Transition Solutions (MGETS) Fund.

The investment will support SkyNRG’s next phase of growth and help achieve its goal to become a major SAF producer.

BofA Securities Europe S.A. acted as sole private placement agent to SkyNRG. Clifford Chance LLP acted as legal advisor to SkyNRG. RBC Capital Markets acted as sole financial advisor and Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP as legal counsel to Macquarie Asset Management.

Additional terms of the investment were not disclosed.

By 2030 SkyNRG aims to build its dedicated SAF facilities in Europe and the US, in cooperation with strategic offtake partners. To date, SkyNRG has secured partnerships with, amongst others, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and Boeing with envisaged long term commitments of up to €4bn in SAF purchases.

SkyNRG has been at the forefront of the development of SAF since it was founded over 14 years ago by, amongst others, Theye Veen and Maarten Van Dijk. They initially focused on creating a market for SAF and supplied the world’s first commercial flight using SAF in 2011. Since then, SkyNRG has expanded and is active in R&D, advisory services and in selling SAF. Today, the company provides SAF to airlines and corporates around the world and is still one of the leading and most active participants on the SAF market.

The SAF industry is benefitting from significant tailwinds, including voluntary corporate offtake commitments aligned to net-zero targets and growing political and regulatory support. This includes the European blending mandate (ReFuelEU) that requires the use of SAF, and the Biden Administration’s SAF Grand Challenge and the Inflation Reduction Act in the US, which is encouraging the use of SAF via strong tax incentives. By 2050, SkyNRG estimates that such incentives will create demand for up to €650bn of investment in the sector and accelerate the aviation industry’s transition away from fossil jet fuels.

Philippe Lacamp, CEO of SkyNRG, commented: “It is critical that SAF production capacity is developed now to enable the aviation industry to meet its net-zero goals. We are very proud that Macquarie has made this strategic investment in our business and are confident that they, with the ongoing support of our existing shareholders, will provide us with the resources and expertise we need to accelerate our growth journey towards becoming a major player in the SAF industry.”

Mark Dooley, Global Head of MAM Green Investments, said: “We have a track record for backing businesses working at the forefront of the energy transition. This is an exciting milestone for us, as our first SAF investment. SkyNRG has been a pioneer in SAF, with an entrepreneurial spirit and a strong commercial focus. We look forward to collaborating with the SkyNRG team as they grow their business and advance solutions to decarbonize the aviation industry.”

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Green hydrogen developer in active discussions for California FID this year

A green hydrogen developer is in active discussions with counterparties as it pursues a final investment decision for its first project.

Houston-based green hydrogen developer Element Resources is in active discussions to reach FID this year on its first green hydrogen project slated for Lancaster, California.

The company had engaged Houlihan Lokey in recent months to lead a capital raise for the project, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The Houlihan mandate had involved raising non-dilutive debt, a process that is believed to have been shelved, said one of the sources.

“We are steadily working our way to an FID this year and are pulling together all parts of the project,” Element CFO Avery Barnebey said via email in response to inquiries. He declined to comment further.

A Houlihan representative did not respond to an email seeking comment.

The Lancaster facility, which is targeted to begin commercial operations in early 2025, will be built on 1,165 acres and consist of 135 MW of solar-powered electrolysis capacity, according to the company’s website. At full capacity, the 18,750 mt per annum of hydrogen produced by the facility will serve the growing demand for clean mobility fuels as well as clean energy for manufacturing.

Element is led by founder and CEO Steve Meheen, an oil & gas industry veteran. Barnebey is a former director of corporate development at California Resources Corporation.

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Turnt up about turndown ratios

Optimizing electrolysis for renewables depends not just on how far you can turn the machine up, but how far you can turn it down. We asked electrolyzer makers: how low can you go?

Optimizing electrolysis for renewables depends not just on how far you can turn the machine up, but how far you can turn it down.

A consensus is growing around the importance of turndown ratios for electrolyzers, with a variety of use cases for green hydrogen requiring the machines to be run at low levels during periods of high power pricing.

Proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers are known for their ability to quickly ramp production up and down, but manufacturers of all stripes have begun to tout their technologies’ turndown ratios, with implications for capital costs and the levelized cost of producing hydrogen from renewable power.

Simply put, some electrolyzer plant operators will likely seek to lower hydrogen production during periods of high power pricing, since the cost of electricity is the largest operating expense. But cycling the electrolyzers completely off and on can lead to added system degradation, giving importance to the ability of the machines to run at low levels.

A study from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) analyzes a US grid buildout through 2050, noting favorable locations and seasonality for power pricing as something of a guideline for green hydrogen development. The study notes that the lowest achievable turndown ratio is a main factor in minimizing hydrogen levelized cost along with the number of hours a system can operate at that minimum level – something that applies to all types of electrolyzers.

“When you start to look at hourly costs from the data in different locations, you see that all of this renewable buildout is going to create opportunities in given locations where you going to have a lot of renewable generation and not a lot of load on the system and that’s going to drive the cost for that energy down,” said Alex Badgett, an author of the study at NREL.

To be sure, the fast-moving technological environment for electrolysis leaves open the possibility for efficiency gains and disruptive innovation. And a variety of factors – balance of plant, energy efficiency, system degradation – also influence plant economics. But the lowest possible turndown ratios will drive opportunities for green hydrogen developers, Badgett said.

ReSource reviewed available spec sheets for electrolyzer providers and asked every maker of PEM and SOEC systems to detail the turndown capabilities of their machines. Alkaline electrolyzers were left out of the analysis given their more limited load flexibility, as their separators are less effective at preventing potentially dangerous cross-diffusion of gasses. Some manufacturers are fully transparent regarding turndown ranges while others declined to comment or did not reply to inquiries.

‘Not trivial’

In designing projects, developers are analyzing hourly energy supply schedules and pairing the outlook with what is known about available technology options.

“Some electrolyzers like to operate at half power, and others like to operate at full power, and in any given system, you can have between 10 and 50 electrolyzers wired and plumbed in parallel,” said Mike Grunow, who leads the Power-to-X platform at Strata Clean Energy.

“Our thought process even goes down to: let’s say you have to operate the H2 plant at 25% throughput. Do you operate all of the electrolyzers at 25%, or do you turn 75% of the electrolyzers off and only operate 25% at full power?”

The difference in the schemes, he added, is “not trivial as each technology has different efficiency curves and drivers of degradation.”

Different use cases for the hydrogen derivative, meanwhile, lead to different natural selection of technologies, Grunow said, adding that the innovation cycle is now happening every 12 months, requiring a close eye on advances in technology. 

Electrolyzer start-up Electric Hydrogen, a maker of PEM electrolyzers, is commercializing a 100 MW system that can turn down to 10%, according to Jason Mortimer, SVP of global sales at the company.

HyAxium, another start-up, can turn its system down to 10%, according to its materials. Norway-based Hystar, which recently announced plans to build a plant in the US, also promotes a 10% turndown ratio.

A more established PEM electrolyzer provider, Cummins, advertises turndown ratios of 5% for its machines. Sungrow Power, a China-based manufacturer, similarly advertises 5% for PEM electrolyzers.

Siemens Energy has a minimum turndown ratio per stack of 40%, but for a single system it can be less in exceptional cases, according to Claudia Nehring, a company spokesperson.

“We focus on large systems” – greater than 100 MW – “and currently consider this value to be appropriate, taking into account the optimization between efficiency, degradation and dynamics, but are working on an improvement,” she said via email.

ITM Power declined to provide details but said its turndown capabilities are “to be expected” for a market leader in this technology. Materials from German-based H-Tec Systems note a modulation rate down to 10%.

Additional PEM makers Nel, Ohmium, Elogen, H2B2, Hoeller Electrolyzer, Plug Power, Shanghai Electric, and Teledyne Energy Systems did not respond to requests for information.

PEM alternatives

Other forms of electrolysis can also ramp dynamically. And some project developers point to PEM’s use of iridium, part of the platinum metals family, as a drawback due to potential scarcity issues.

Verdagy, for example, has developed an advanced alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) system called eDynamic that it says takes the best of PEM and alkaline technologies while designing out the downsides.

The company’s technology “addresses the barriers that limited traditional AWE adoption by using single-element cells that can operate efficiently at high current densities,” executives said in response to emailed questions. 

“The ability to operate at very high current densities, coupled with a balance of stack and balance of plant optimized for dynamic operation, allow Verdagy’s electrolyzers to operate across a very broad range spanning 0.1-2.0 A/cm2,” they said.

In other words, the machine can turn down to 5%, part of the design that enables operators “to modulate production to take advantage of time-of-day pricing and/or fluctuations in energy production.”

Meanwhile, German-based Thysenkrupp Nucera, another maker of advanced water electrolyzers, advertises a 10% turndown ratio.

SOEC

A relatively new electrolysis technology, the solid oxide electrolyzer cell has also proven to be capable of low turndown ratios. Solid oxide electrolysis is particularly attractive when paired with high-temperature industrial processes, where heat can be captured and fed back into the high-temperature SOEC process, making it more efficient.

Joel Moser, the CEO of First Ammonia, said he chose SOEC from Denmark-based Haldor Topsoe in part because the machines can be turned completely off with no degradation, as long as you keep them warm.

“Generally speaking we expect to ramp up and ramp down between 100% and 10%,” he said. “We can turn them off as long as we keep them warm, and then we can turn them right back on.”

Still, SOEC systems are not without challenges.

“Low stack power and high operating temperature, which in turn requires more ancillary equipment to operate the electrolyzer, are widely viewed as the main drawbacks of SOEC technology,” according to a report from the Clean Air Task Force, which explores SOEC technology and its commercial prospects. “SOEC systems are also considered to have a shorter operating life due to thermal stress.”

Additional makers of SOEC machines Bloom Energy, Ceres, Elcogen, Genvia, SolydERA, and Toshiba did not respond to inquiries.

At NREL, researchers are watching for more automation and scale in the electrolyzer production process to bring costs down. Increasing efficiency through balance-of-plant improvements is another opportunity to reduce system costs.

In addition, more analysis of how large electrolyzer projects will impact the future electrical grid is required, according to Badgett.

The NREL team modeled the hourly marginal cost at any given time in any location in the US, but the model assumes that the electrolyzer takes energy without impacting the cost of energy.

“When we start to get to gigawatt-scale electrolysis,” he said, “that’s going to significantly impact prices, as well as how the grid is going to build out.”

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Developer Profile: Green hydrogen developer finds strength in numbers

Clean Energy Holdings is assembling a coalition of specialized companies as it seeks to break into the novel green hydrogen market.

Nicholas Bair draws a direct line from his childhood on an Oregon dairy farm to the coalition of specialized companies that, as the CEO of Clean Energy Holdings, he is now assembling in pursuit of key-player status in the green hydrogen industry.

“We created our own milk from our own hay,” he says, of his family’s organic dairy farm in Klamath Falls, near the California border. He adds, using an expression he often repeats: “Everything was inside the battery limits.”

This phrase – “inside the battery limits” – represents what Bair, who is forty-one and a chemist by trade, is trying to achieve with The Alliance: a broad, self-contained battery of partners with specialized competencies working in coordination on the challenges of developing and operating groundbreaking green hydrogen projects.

“We’re doing everything from soup to nuts,” he says.

CEH and The Alliance are planning to build roughly $1bn worth of projects per year over the next ten years, Bair says. As a launching point, the parties are advancing a green hydrogen facility – called Clear Fork – near Sylvester, Texas that would churn out 30,000 kg per day in phase 1 starting in 4Q24. The hydrogen would be produced using electrolyzers powered by a 325 MW solar farm, while ancillary facilities at the site would be powered by a gas turbine capable of blending up to 70% hydrogen.

As members of The Alliance, Equix Inc. is acting as the EPC for the solar and gas turbine portion of the project, while Chart Industries is providing tankers, trailers, and liquefaction to transport hydrogen from the site in northwest Texas. Meanwhile, Hartford Steam Boiler – an original contributor to standards written by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers – will provide quality assurance and control; Coast 2 Coast Logistics is responsible for trucking; and The Eastman Group provides permitting and facilities management.

‘First-of-kind’

Although a renewable project, the green hydrogen concept is similar to most refinery EPC contracts, since many of them are first-of-kind with significant liquidated damages, Bair says. Additionally, the green hydrogen projects are “married to renewables, and you need the cryogenics and the distribution in between.”

Before starting Clean Energy Holdings, Bair was the founder and CEO of Bair Energy, a program and construction manager for infrastructure and energy projects – a service that Bair Energy is providing as a member of the Alliance. A period of low natural gas prices made Bair Energy’s specialty – geothermal power – less competitive, and Bair, seeking to develop his own projects instead of managing projects for others, sought to branch out into new types of energies.

Bair Energy itself consists of professionals that have been cherry-picked from the industry, Bair says. Candice McGuire, a veteran of Shell and Technip, is Bair’s chairman; chief operations officer John Strawn recently joined from Technip; and wind-industry veteran Peder Hansen has joined as VP and chief engineering manager.

“Our experience on the team is taking first-of-kind, developing it, and getting it to market,” he says. With The Alliance, “We went out and found the best at what they do, put them on lump-sum order, and brought them to the table early to figure out how to make their product talk to the other person’s product, so we can have a guarantee,” he says.

What distinguishes Clean Energy Holdings from other green hydrogen developers is, in fact, the coalition it is building, says Elizabeth Sluder, a partner at Norton Rose Fulbright who is CEH’s legal advisor.

“It’s intended to be one-stop shopping in a vertically integrated structure such that as and when needed for future CEH projects or third party projects that are identified, you have all the various players you need to take it from point A to point B,” she adds.

Because the parties are on standby with a common goal, CEH and its partners can provide lump-sum turnkey services, with some element of bulk pricing potentially factored in, because savings are generated through not having to issue RFPs for partners in future projects.

“The savings in time and money is, I would expect, very valuable,” Sluder says. “And when you apply those principles to long-term strategy and equity investment-type opportunities, the lower capex spend should theoretically benefit the project at large.”

Keeping the pieces moving

Bair runs CEH alongside Co-Founder and President Cornelius Fitzgerald. The two met as children – Fitzgerald was raised on a nearby cattle farm in southern Oregon – and enjoy the uncommon chemistry of childhood friends.

In something of classic pairing, “I’m much more the trumpet, paving the path,” Bair says, while Fitzgerald “usually keeps the pieces moving.”

“Sometimes Cornelius has had the best cup of coffee and takes the lead in meetings. And sometimes I do,” he says. “It’s that ability to rely on each other that set the basis of design in my mind for what a good partner looks like.”

Fitzgerald says they approach the challenge of breaking new ground in green hydrogen with “quiet confidence and humility.” By having a big picture vision as well as “credible and tangible fundamentals for the project” – like land, resource, and water control – the project moved from an idea to a reality, he adds.

“And really we’ve been driving at how to get the best experience and expertise at the table as early as possible,” Fitzgerald says.

Equix, Inc, a civil engineering firm, joined the grouping to build the solar and gas generation portion of the facility, representing the company’s first-ever foray into a hydrogen project, says Tim LeVrier, a vice president of business development at the firm.

“There are many challenges integrating all these types of power sources and energy into creating hydrogen,” Levrier says. “From an electrical engineering standpoint it is extremely challenging to coordinate power switching from one source to another. Another consideration we are having to work through is what to do in regards to producing hydrogen at night. Will there be a battery portion to the project or do we just not produce hydrogen when it is dark? These are all things we are considering and will have to find creative solutions for.”

‘Pathological believer’

CEH recently added Chart Industries to The Alliance, which in addition to furnishing liquefaction, tanks and trailers to move hydrogen, will provide fin fans for cooling and a reverse osmosis system for cleaning water. “We don’t want to give away all our secrets,” Bair says, “but it’s a very efficient process.”

The unique perspective and expertise of partners in The Alliance makes for a fulsome ecosystem around any CEH project, says Jill Evanko, CEO of Chart Industries. With respect to CEH’s projects, Evanko says they are “very targeted, which, with focus, will continue to help evolve the hydrogen economy.”

“Chart’s hydrogen liquefaction process as well as associated hydrogen equipment including storage tanks and trailers” – which the company has been manufacturing for over 57 years – “will be sole-source provided into the project. This will allow for efficient engineering and manufacturing to the CEH Clear Fork project schedule,” she says.

In any molecule value chain, hydrogen included, Chart serves customers that are the producers of the molecule, those who store and transport it as well as those who are the end users, Evanko adds. “This allows us to connect those who are selling the molecule with those who need it.”

Looking ahead, CEH is preparing to meet with investors in the lead-up to an April, 2023 final investment decision deadline for the Texas project. And it is being advised by RockeTruck for another RFP seeking fuel cell vehicles to transport hydrogen from the site as the trucks become available – a design that will likely include hydrogen fueling stations at the production facility as well as at the Port of Corpus Christi, Bair says.

CEH also has plans to develop its own geothermal plants and explore the role that nuclear energy can play in green hydrogen. Bair Energy recently hired Eric Young as its VP of engineering and technology from NuScale, where he worked on the research team that received approvals from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a small modular nuclear reactor.

“We’re a technology-driven owner-operator,” Bair says. “We’re all technologists, which means we’re pathological believers in technology. We’re all looking for transformational energy.”

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