Resource logo with tagline

Carbon credit project developer planning equity raise

A Texas-based carbon credit firm is preparing to sell credits from its first project in the US southeast and planning its first equity raise in 2024.

Sky Harvest Carbon, the Dallas-based carbon credit project developer, is preparing to sell credits from its first project, roughly 30,000 acres of forest in the southeastern US, while looking toward its first equity raise in 2024, CEO and founder Will Clayton said in an interview.

In late 2024 the company will seek to raise between $5m and $10m in topco equity, depending on the outcome of grant applications, Clayton said. The company is represented by Scott Douglass & McConnico in Austin, Texas and does not have a relationship with a financial advisor.

Sky Harvest considers itself a project developer, using existing liquidity to pay landowners on the backend for timber rights, then selling credits based on the volume and age of the trees for $20 to $50 per credit (standardized as 1 mtpy of carbon).

The company will sell some 45,000 credits from its pilot project — comprised of acreage across Virginia, North Carolina, Louisiana and Mississippi – in 2024, Clayton said. The project involves 20 landowners.

Clayton, formerly chief of staff at North Carolina-based renewables and P2X developer Strata Clean Energy, owns a controlling stake in Sky Harvest Carbon. He said he’s self-funded operations to date, in part with private debt. The company is also applying for a multi-million-dollar grant based on working with small and underrepresented landowners.

“There’s a wall of demand… that’s coming against a supply constraint,” Clayton said of companies wanting to buy credits to meet carbon reduction goals.

Sky Harvest would be interested in working with companies wanting to secure supply or credits before price spikes, or investors wanting to acquire the credits as an asset prior to price spikes, Clayton said.

“Anybody who wants to go long on carbon, either as an investment thesis or for the climate benefits to offset operational footprint, it’s a great way to do it by locking supply at a low cost,” he said.

A novel approach to credit definition

Carbon credits on the open market vary widely in verifications standards and price; they can cost anywhere from $1 to $2,000.

“There’s a long process for all the measurements and verifications,” Clayton said.

There are many forestry carbon developers paying landowners for environmental benefits and selling those credits. Where Sky Harvest is unique is its attempt to redefine the carbon credit, Clayton said.

The typical definition of 1 mtpy of CO2 is problematic, as it does not gauge for duration of storage, he said. Carbon emitted into the atmosphere can stay there indefinitely.

“If you’re storing carbon for 10, 20, 30 years, the scales don’t balance,” Clayton said. “That equation breaks and it’s not truly an offset.”

Sky Harvest is quantifying the value of carbon over time by equating volume with duration, Clayton said.

“If you have one ton of carbon dioxide going into the atmosphere forever on one side of the scale, you need multiple tons of carbon dioxide stored on the other side of the scale if it’s for any time period other than forever,” he said, noting that credit providers often cannot guarantee that the protected trees will never be harvested. Sky Harvest inputs more than 1 ton per credit, measured in periods of five years guaranteed storage at a time. “We compensate for the fact that it’s not going to be stored there forever.”

Monitoring protected land is expensive and often difficult to sustain. Carbon markets work much like conservation easements, but those easements often lose effect over time as oversight diminishes (typically because of staffing or funding shortages at the often nonprofit groups charged with monitoring).

“That doesn’t work in any other industry with real physical commodities,” Clayton said. “The way every other industry works is you pay a fund delivery. That’s our measure-as-you-go approach.”

A similar methodology has been put forward by the United Nations and has been adopted in Quebec, Clayton said.

Unlock this article

The content you are trying to view is exclusive to our subscribers.
To unlock this article:

You might also like...

Deutsche Bahn and Fortescue developing ammonia-hydrogen engine

Deutsche Bahn and Fortescue Future Industries are working on modifying diesel engines for locomotives and traction vehicles for ammonia and hydrogen.

Deutsche Bahn and Fortescue Future Industries are working on modifying diesel engines for locomotives and traction vehicles so that they can be operated with ammonia and hydrogen, according to a press release.

Both sides have signed a corresponding Letter of Intent. In addition to the development of emission-free propulsion technologies, the agreement also provides for cooperation in logistics and supply chains for green fuels.

Deutche Bahn and Siemens Mobility recently developed a hydrogen system for rail through the EUR 13.74m (USD 14.47m) H2goesRail project, funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry for Digital Affairs and Transport (BMDV) as part of the country’s National Innovation Programme for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology.

Read More »

HSB joining Green Hydrogen and Technology Alliance

The engineering and technical risk insurer will focus on inspection test plans and storage and transportation solutions.

HSB has joined the Clean Energy Holdings Renewable Energy and Technology Alliance Platform, according to a press release.

The engineering and technical risk insurer, based in Hartford, Connecticut, has been a member of Munich Re’s Risk Solutions family since 2009. Its role in the group will be to focus on inspection test plans and storage and transportation solutions.

The Alliance comprises Clean Energy Holdings (with ING Americas as financial advisor), Bair Energy, Chart Industries, Equix, RockeTruck, Coast 2 Coast Logistics, and The Eastman Group.

“As the largest Authorized Inspection Agency (AIA) accredited by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), HSB’s contribution to the Renewable Energy and Technology Alliance will focus on defining safe plans for this clean energy emerging industry,” the release states.

Read More »

Ares acquires RNG developer

Ares has made a strategic investment to acquire RNG developer Dynamic Renewables in a process run by Lazard.

Dynamic Renewables, a full-service developer, owner and operator of waste management and anaerobic digestion renewable fuel projects across the U.S., has been acquired by fund managed by Ares Management’s Infrastructure Opportunities strategy, according to a news release.

In addition, an unregulated affiliate of NorthWestern Energy has acquired a small minority stake in the company.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Lazard acted as financial advisor to Dynamic on the transaction. Husch Blackwell served as legal counsel to Dynamic. Latham & Watkins LLP served as legal counsel to Ares.

The investment from Ares is intended to support Dynamic in the further development and construction of its broader pipeline of renewable natural gas (“RNG”) assets located throughout the U.S. Ares has approximately $14.9bn in infrastructure equity and debt assets under management as of March 31.

Founded in 2011, Dynamic is a leading fully integrated origination, development, financing and operations platform that provides waste recovery solutions focused on the dairy and food processing industries. Dynamic has a material project development pipeline and is currently overseeing the construction of six assets, which are expected to be operational by the end of 2023 and forecasted to generate a combined total of more than 4,000 MMBtu per day of renewable natural gas. These six projects are projected to mitigate more than 300,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year.

Dynamic is also the owner of BC Organics, a flagship asset developed by the Company. Located in Brown County, Wisconsin, BC Organics is a large-scale biorefinery facility that sources dairy manure feedstock from eleven multigenerational farms and comprises sixteen anaerobic digester tanks capable of processing 900,000 gallons of manure per day. BC Organics will produce carbon negative transportation fuel and provide its partner dairy farms with a long-term, sustainable manure management solution that converts the feedstock into clean water and reusable animal bedding.

Dynamic is led by its co-founders – Chief Executive Officer Duane Toenges, Chief Technology Officer Dan Nemke and Executive Vice President of Special Projects Karl Crave – who have worked together in the anaerobic digestion industry for nearly two decades.

“We are excited about the business we have built in Dynamic and our current momentum,” said Toenges. “Ares brings a wealth of experience in investing and developing projects in the renewable natural gas industry. They have expressed their support for the Company and our strategy in achieving our next phase of growth. Further, the recent commissioning of our BC Organics project is a tremendous milestone for Dynamic, and we look forward to completing additional projects this year for our strategic partners.”

“We are thrilled to partner with Dynamic, and our investment is aligned with Ares’ commitment to accelerate the transition to a lower-carbon economy through the Company’s innovative waste management and anaerobic digestion capabilities,” said Andy Pike, partner and co-head of Ares Infrastructure Opportunities. “Dynamic has a demonstrated track record of leadership in the rapidly growing renewable fuels sector, and we look forward to working together to build out its pipeline while supporting local communities in delivering more sustainable waste management practices.”

“We are pleased to further our existing relationship with Dynamic with this minority investment in the Company,” said Brian Bird, president and chief executive officer of NorthWestern. “The investment in Dynamic is a positive step for NorthWestern in meeting its net zero goals and a great opportunity to expand the RNG production capabilities of our service territory and its surrounding area. We are excited about the growth of the RNG industry, the carbon negative fuel that Dynamic’s assets will generate, and the complementary nature of this investment with our long-term goals.”

Read More »

Exclusive: CO2-to-X firm seeking platform and project capital

A CO2-to-X development company with proprietary CO2 utilization technology is seeking to raise capital from potential strategic partners that would utilize its product, which can decarbonize industrial emitters while producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide. For methanol production, the company says it can reduce the amount of natural gas required per ton of methanol to 27 MMBtu, compared to the typical 35 MMBtu, “a massive change in a commodity market,” a company executive said in an interview.

HYCO1, a founder-owned CO2-to-X development company with proprietary CO2 utilization technology, is seeking partners to invest at both the platform and project level as it advances a series of commercial proposals.

Based in Houston and owned by its three founders, the firm is developing and commercializing technology that utilizes waste CO2 and methane to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which can then be used to make low-carbon syngas, fuels, chemicals, and solid carbon products.

The founders went “all in” on the technology and funded the first $10m for development themselves, and have since raised an additional $10m from two different ethanol producers that are planning to use the product, called HYCO1 CUBE, at their ethanol plants.

“We’re in the process of raising between $20m – $30m this year, with one or more strategics in investment sizes of $10m or more,” HYCO1 co-founder and CFO Jeffrey Brimhall said in an interview.

Beyond that, Brimhall says the firm plans to close on project financing for various projects in development, “which will spin development capital, license fees, and revenue back to HYCO1.”

HYCO1 is having direct conversations for the platform capital with the investment teams from potential strategic partners – like further ethanol producers, or specialty chemical producers and other operators of steam methane reformers.

Using the technology, the company hopes to qualify for tax credit incentives under 45V for the hydrogen produced utilizing recycled CO2 as a feedstock, as reflected in comments made last week to the IRS.

Projects in development

Meanwhile, HYCO1 is advancing a first three projects to maturity: a $175m green carbon syngas project on the US Gulf Coast; a $400m green methanol project on the Gulf Coast; and a $1.2bn green carbon synthetics project at an existing ethanol plant in Lyons, Kansas.

For the Kansas ethanol project, HYCO1 is having conversations with the “top five banks,” Brimhall said, about a project finance deal. 

“We’re starting offtake discussions for both methanol and synthetics,” he said. “And as those offtake discussions firm up, we know for a fact that big intermediaries are going to want to come in and we’re likely going to work with those who have discretionary capital that they can invest on their own account and then pull in others with them.”

The company recently entered into a 20-year carbon dioxide supply agreement with Kansas Ethanol for the project. It will be co-located with Kansas Ethanol and utilize all 800 tons per day of CO2 emitted by the plant to produce approximately 60 million gallons per year of low-carbon and zero-carbon products.

HYCO1 is working to reach FID on the Kansas project by 1Q25, but its critical path depends on getting in the pipeline of an ISODEWAXING provider, such as Chevron or Johnson Matthey, said Kurt Dieker, another HYCO1 co-founder and its chief development officer.

“Assuming a conservative schedule, assuming they get engaged in the next 10 weeks, that would put us in 1Q of next year” for FID, said Dieker, who has deep experience in the ethanol industry, having worked for ICM, the technology behind 70% of the ethanol gallons produced in the US today.

The CUBE

HYCO1’s CUBE technology essentially works as a conversion catalyst applying heat to CO2 and methane to create hydrogen and carbon monoxide, the building blocks of virtually all petrochemical and carbon-based downstream products.

The company built a pilot facility in Houston two years ago, and has been characterizing the catalyst with 10,000 hours of uptime operation and data on how it works, Brimhall said.

As it was advancing the CUBE characterization process, the founders found they could shape the syngas ratio on the fly, moving it from 1-to-1 to above 3-to-1, he added.

“And because we’ve done the 1-to-1 all the way up to 3.5+-to-1, we also know we can produce pure CO by essentially taking the hydrogen off and using it as part of the endotherm that we need to make the reaction work,” he said. “So we could produce anywhere from pure CO to effectively pure hydrogen.”

That level of flexibility with a “single plant, single process, single catalyst” has never been done before, according to Brimhall, and it gives the company “immense capabilities to go into virtually any situation and solve for decarbonization and at the same time make high value products downstream.”

He added, “When we talk to people that really know the space and know industrial gases, they’re like, ‘Wait a minute, you can do that?’”

Methanol efficiencies

HYCO1 is currently in talks with six super major methanol producers about using the company’s technology for methanol supply, Brimhall said.

“Every one of them immediately went to diligence on our technology,” he said, noting that HYCO1 has promised to make natural gas-based methanol production more efficient, requiring only 27 MMBtu of natural gas per ton of methanol versus the typical 35 MMBtu of natural gas. 

“The difference between 35 MMBtu and 27 or 25 is a massive change in a commodity market,” Brimand said, “and whoever owns that technology is going to have a competitive advantage.

The methanol majors are evaluating how to use the technology to their benefit, which, according to Brimhall, might require them to make an investment in HYCO1 along with the first plant. 

“We’ve spent the last three or four months driving the technical diligence part with a team of 15 engineer PhDs to basically come back and say to them, ‘Here’s the proof, here’s the number.’”

HYCO1 plans to offer it concurrently to all of the methanol producers in order to extract the best terms on the first projects, he said.

Project developer or licensor?

HYCO1’s business model comes down to whether they are a project developer or a licensor of technology. According to Brimhall, they are a project developer first and a technology licensor second.

“We have to be project development oriented in our minds across multiple verticals in order to get traction and proof, viability, efficacy,” he said. “So we’re acting in a kind of a super-project developer mode to ultimately get the attention of big offtakers, strategic partners, and potential licensors downstream.”

However, a large licensor will not likely step in to provide a multi-project license until they see the product working at scale given the breakthrough nature of the technology, Brimhall said, and the economics that flow from it.

Take syngas for example, a market dominated by a few large players like Air Liquide, Air Products, and Linde. HYCO1 wants to position its first project in that sector and then start having licensing discussions with those big firms, or additional engineering firms like Technip, Fleur, or Bechtel.

The large firms could provide an initial “bolus” of capital to HYCO1 for having developed the technology “and getting a license that means something, whether it’s geographic or it’s exclusive worldwide or it’s bi-vertical,” Brimhall said.

“There’s an initial payment that commensurates with what the market opportunity is. And then there’s a minimum they’re going to have to step up to in order to keep us satisfied that they’re really a licensor that is going to ultimately realize value to the Topco or HYCO1 as a TechCo.”

“So it’s really project development first, licensing second kind of business model,” he added. “And it’s on multiple verticals. That’s what happens when you have, you know, potent technology.”

Read More »

Exclusive: Glenfarne exploring hydrogen projects on existing asset base

Glenfarne Energy Transition is advancing its flagship liquefied natural gas project, Texas LNG, and evaluating hydrogen projects on or near its existing asset base on the Gulf Coast.

The Biden administration’s pause on permits for new US liquefied natural gas facilities hasn’t hurt all unbuilt projects.

Glenfarne Energy Transition, a subsidiary of Glenfarne Group, is moving ahead with its fully permitted lower-carbon flagship LNG export facility, Texas LNG, as the project is now set up to be the only such US project to reach FID this year.

Texas LNG, a 4 million MTPA facility proposed for Brownsville, Texas, will be the lowest carbon emitting LNG facility approved in the US, largely due to its use of electric motors in refrigerated compression. 

As designed, the plant would emit .15 metric tons of CO2e per ton of LNG produced, placing it slightly lower than the much larger Freeport LNG facility, which also has electric motors and emits around .17 metric tons of CO2 per ton of LNG.

The carbon intensity measurement counts emissions at the Texas LNG plant only, and not related emissions from the electric grid, which is why Glenfarne is seeking to source power for the project from wind and solar generation in south Texas, Adam Prestidge, senior vice president at Glenfarne, said in an interview.

In fact, the lower carbon aspects of Texas LNG helps with every element of the project, Prestidge said, including conversations with European offtakers and potential debt investors.

“Having a focus on sustainability is table stakes for every conversation,” he added. “It’s the finance side, it’s the offtake side, it’s our conversations with regulatory agencies.”

LNG pause

Glenfarne is seeking to raise up to $5bn of equity and debt for the project, according to news reports, a process that could benefit from the Biden administration’s pause on issuing permits for LNG projects that export to countries without free-trade agreements with the US.

“Our confidence and our timetable for that has probably been accelerated and cemented by the fact we are fully permitted, despite the Biden LNG pause impacting the broader market,” Prestidge said.

“The market has pretty quickly recognized that if you want to invest in LNG or buy LNG from a project that’s going to FID in 2024, you really don’t have very many fully permitted options right now.”

Glenfarne’s other US LNG project, called Magnolia LNG, has not yet received the required federal approvals and is therefore on pause along with a handful of other projects.

For Magnolia, Glenfarne is proposing to use a technology for which it owns the patent: optimized single mixed refrigerant, or OSMR, which uses ammonia instead of propane for cooling, resulting in less feed gas needed to run the facility and thus about 30% lower emissions than the average gas-powered LNG facility, Prestidge said.

Hydrogen projects

Glenfarne Energy Transition last year announced the formation of its hydrogen initiative, saying that projects in Chile, Texas, and Louisiana would eventually produce 1,500 kilotons of ammonia. 

“We’ve got existing infrastructure in the US Gulf Coast, and in Chile. A lot of the infrastructure required to produce LNG is similar or can be easily adapted to the infrastructure needed to produce ammonia,” Prestidge said. “And so, we’ve looked at locating hydrogen and ammonia production at sites in or near the ports of Brownsville and Lake Charles,” where Texas LNG and Magnolia LNG are located, respectively.

“The familiarity with the sites and the infrastructure and the local elements, make those pretty good fits for us,” he added.

Read More »
Cement hills
exclusive

Ammonia-to-industrial heat provider raising early-stage capital

An early-stage technology provider targeting clients in hard-to-abate industries is engaging investors and financial advisors to raise a seed round, with sites on a Series A in 2025.

Captain Energy, a Houston-based provider of ammonia-to-industrial heat technology, is seeking strategic investors for an early-stage seed round with plans for an eventual Series A, co-founder and interim-CEO Kirk Coburn said in an interview.

The company is developing a single-step process that can create industrial heat from cracked ammonia up to 700 degrees Celsius with zero NOX emissions, with hydrogen as a byproduct, Coburn said. The process uses a ceramic-based tubular solid oxide fuel cell that Captain manufactures in Dundee, Scotland.

“The results from the testing are that we’re 85% efficient,” Coburn said.

He likened the company to Amogy, but serving steel, cement and chemicals instead of transportation. Getting the kind of high-quality heat those industries need in a clean way can only come from a few sources, he noted.
“Ammonia is one of the greatest ways to do it if you can crack it efficiently like we can,” he said.
Past lab

The company is “past the lab stage” and needs to develop a pilot product to showcase to customers, Coburn said. About $5m will get the company to a 100-kilogram-per-day product, up from 25 kilograms now.

“That’s not, probably, big enough for most customers, but we can stack them,” Coburn said. “At this point we need to demonstrate commercially the product… after showcasing it we want to make larger units.”

Captain is owned by three co-founders, including Coburn. They have an 18-month line of site on a “much larger” Series A, Coburn said.

Strategic investors that would be end users of the technology are of interest to the company, particularly in Asian and European markets.

“We’re not getting in the game of making ammonia,” Coburn said. “We have to buy green ammonia.”

The company’s model is at “grid-parity” in Europe now, Coburn said, pointing to Germany in particular.

“We think we’re almost at subsidy-free pricing,” he said.

Read More »

Welcome Back

Get Started

Sign up for a free 15-day trial and get the latest clean fuels news in your inbox.