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CO2-to-SAF firm in $100m capital raise

A New York-based CO2-to-SAF firm is raising about $100m in equity and debt.

Dimensional Energy, the CO2-to-SAF startup based in Ithaca, New York, is in the late stages of a roughly $100m equity and debt round led internally, according to a source familiar with the matter.

The company is down to a shortlist of potential investors with two or three weeks until targeted close, the source said.

Dimensional did not respond to a request for comment.

Proprietary reactor technology powered by renewables is the core of Dimension’s regenerative process. According to its website, the company can make 15 barrels of fuel from every 10 tons of carbon sources form the atmosphere and hydrogen derived form electrolysis.

In May, the company signed an offtake agreement for 5 million gallons per year with Boom Supersonic, which is seeking to build a supersonic airliner that will travel at speeds twice as fast as today’s commercial jets.

Dimensional started production at a pilot-scale COutilization plant in Tucson, Arizona last year.

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Heliogen expecting equity partners for California H2 facility

The company anticipates bringing on additional equity partners to support the project’s construction costs.

Heliogen has signed an MOU with the City of Lancaster, California to develop and provide equity for a green hydrogen generation facility there, according to a press release.

“Heliogen expects to bring on additional equity partners to support the project’s construction costs,” the release states.

The City of Lancaster will assist with site identification, review by City Council and the community as required, support for permitting process, and evaluation of economic development potential.

This relationship is expected to accelerate the use of concentrating solar thermal energy for a commercial hydrogen generation facility and builds upon the existing relationship between the City of Lancaster and Heliogen, which sited its demonstration test facility in the city in 2019.

The facility is expected to leverage Heliogen’s patented technology to use AI and advanced computer vision software to concentrate sunlight and could generate up to 1500 metric tons per year of carbon-free hydrogen.

The Heliogen facility could help support other projects within the city and region, including sustainable aviation fuel for hydrogen-powered aircraft, fueling stations for hydrogen-powered vehicles, and sales and distribution of hydrogen fuel for industrial processes such as vertical agriculture, cement, and mining.

This news follows a recent announcement that Heliogen intends to develop a green hydrogen facility on leased land in the Brenda Solar Energy Zone in Arizona. The company also entered into a letter of intent with sustainable fuels-focused Dimensional Energy to produce sustainable aviation fuel.

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Lummus launches ethanol-based SAF technology

The company has made its ethanol to SAF process technology commercially available.

Lummus Technology, a global provider of process technologies and value-driven energy solutions, announced the commercial availability of its ethanol to sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) process technology, according to a news release.

The technology provides operators with a large-scale, commercially demonstrated solution to reduce the aviation industry’s greenhouse gas emissions.
“Lummus’ extensive commercial experience in all steps, including conversion of ethanol feedstock and production of the SAF process, gives us a unique advantage to help our customers produce sustainable fuels,” said Leon de Bruyn, president and Chief Executive Officer of Lummus Technology. “Our process leverages proven, commercial-scale technologies that we integrate to meet the aviation industry’s growing demand for SAF and support its decarbonization efforts.”

Lummus’ ethanol to SAF technology offers a safe and reliable solution by integrating ethanol to ethylene (EtE), olefin oligomerization and hydrogenation technologies in a process configuration that maximizes the final yield to SAF while minimizing CAPEX, OPEX and carbon emissions.
Central to this process is Lummus and Braskem’s technology partnership for producing green ethylene, which accelerates the use of bioethanol and supports the industry’s efforts towards a carbon neutral economy. Since 2010, Braskem has been operating an ethanol dehydration unit in Brazil. Using EtE EverGreen™ technology, the unit provides a proven and reliable foundation for producing 260 kilotons per year of ethylene from ethanol. Lummus has integrated this world-scale dehydration process with its light olefins oligomerization and advanced hydroprocessing technologies through Chevron Lummus Global, a joint venture with Chevron.

This integrated offering makes the entire ethanol to SAF value chain available for exclusive licensing by Lummus.

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Fitch lays out credit considerations for green hydrogen financing

Key operating metrics include the efficiency and rate of hydrogen production, plant availability, the ability to respond to intermittent power, and hydrogen purity levels.

Fitch Ratings has set out specific credit-risk considerations relevant to green hydrogen projects in a new report.

Fitch considers the credit risks of such projects to have the closest parallels to those of thermal power assets, and to generally be at least equal to – but potentially greater than – thermal power risks. Future technology and process developments will be evaluated and incorporated in ratings as the industry matures.

Whilst there are two key proven electrolyser technologies for producing hydrogen from renewable energy and water, the green hydrogen market is still nascent, meaning that precedents for project-financed transactions are very limited.

Green hydrogen projects have a greater range of balance of plant than solar, wind or thermal power projects. Complexity, and consequently integration risk, will therefore have a key influence on the completion risk assessment in any rating.

The availability of alternative replacement contractors to complete a project will be key for whether it can be rated above the incumbent contractor.The immaturity of the market will heighten the weight given to independent experts’ (IE) views in relation to such replaceability. We also generally expect high dependence on project parties, such as original equipment manufacturers, who will be key in O&M activities due to their expertise and equipment warranties.

The limited number of peer green hydrogen projects also means Fitch will be more reliant on the IE’s views of the reasonableness of a project’s budgeted or contracted operating costs. Any perceived lack of credibility, competence and experience of the project parties could be factored into the financial profile assessed in our ratings.

Key operating metrics include the efficiency, and rate, of hydrogen production, the plant availability, the ability to respond to intermittent power, and, where this is critical, the hydrogen purity levels.

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exclusive

Siemens Energy NA executive priming for scale in hydrogen

The North American wing of the global technology company is in the earliest stages of engaging EPC providers and economic development officials for its next US electrolyzer manufacturing site, Richard Voorberg, president of Siemens Energy North America, said in an interview.

To say the demand for electrolyzer capacity has grown exponentially in 2022 comes across as an understatement, as customers in industry and energy have increased their orders multiple times over.

Siemens Energy North America’s electrolyzer – which is 18 MW and among the largest in the market – was too large for many customers just a year ago, Richard Voorberg, president of Siemens Energy North America, said in an interview. But following passage of the IRA, the question became how many the customer could get – and how fast.

“How quickly can I get 100 of your electrolyzers?” Voorberg said he hears now, whereas before that same customer might have asked for half an electrolyzer.

The decision to make an electrolyzer as large as 18 MW was part of the company’s strategy to have bigger capacity as the market for hydrogen expanded, Voorberg said.

HIF Global recently said it has tapped Siemens Energy to engineer and design their proprietary “Silyzer 300” electrolyzers to produce approximately 300,000 tons per year of green hydrogen at an eFuels facility in Texas.

Siemens Energy NA is now in the earliest stages of developing a new electrolyzer manufacturing plant in the United States, as previously reported by ReSource.

The US plant will be similar to the plant Siemens Energy is building in Berlin, and won’t be built until after Berlin is completed, Voorberg said.

The company is actively engaging with state economic development committees to scout locations, incentives and labor supplies. It is also in the early stages of engaging engineers, EPC providers and other development partners, Voorberg said.

“We also need to decide in the next few months what we want to do in-house, with our own shops, versus what we want to outsource,” Voorberg said.

North Carolina, Houston, Alabama and upstate New York are all in Siemens Energy’s existing footprint and are as such strong contenders for the new facility, Voorberg said, though nothing is set in stone as far as location. The company would finance the facility within its normal capex expenses within a year.

In electrolyzer manufacturing there is some “test hydrogen” that is produced, so there will be a need to find some small offtaker for that, Voorberg said. The company could also use it to supply its own fork-trucks in the future.

Open to acquisitions

Diving into an acquisition of another electrolyzer manufacturer probably would not make sense for Siemens Energy, Voorberg said. But the company is open to M&A.

He cited the acquisition of Airfoil Components in Florida as the type of deal that the company could move on again. In that case, the target company had expertise in casting that was easier to acquire than build from scratch.

“Does that make more sense that we buy it, that we outsource it, or should we be doing something like that ourselves?” Voorberg said are questions he often asks.

“When it comes to less complicated things, like a commodity market, that’s not something we play well in or need to play well in,” Voorberg said. “When it comes to a specialty design-type product, that’s where we at Siemens Energy shine.”

Right now, the Siemens Energy parent company has a bid out to acquire the third of Siemens Gamesa, the Spanish-listed wind engineering company, that it does not own, Voorberg noted.

Start-up opportunity

Siemens Energy, through its in-house venture capital group and partnerships with US universities, is interested in helping technology startups scale, Voorberg said.

“We can play in between them and the customers and do the introductions and potentially even partner in with some of our technology,” he said.

The company keeps close relationships with incubators at Georgia Tech and the University of Central Florida, among others, Voorberg said.

Equity investments will be made through the VC group, Voorberg said, noting that effort as one that is strategic in growing the energy transition, rather than financial.

Additional non-equity partnerships, similar to the fellowship with the Bill Gates-founded Breakthrough Energy, are on the table as well.

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NOx mitigation firm looking to scale

A publicly listed company with a hydrogen burner project backed by one of the largest US utilities could accelerate growth with a capital infusion in pursuit of first-adopter clients. It offers technology that aims to mitigate an underappreciated aspect of the embryonic clean hydrogen ecosystem: blending hydrogen with natural gas can greatly increase NOx emissions when combusted.

ClearSign Technologies, the publicly listed burner solutions provider, is at an inflection point in the development of its products to serve players in the emerging hydrogen landscape, CEO Jim Deller said in an interview.

“We’re new,” Deller said of the company’s emergence on the hydrogen scene. The company is aggressively seeking a place in the hydrogen mainstream as it pursues first-adopter clients. “We need to get our install base up.”

ClearSign recently received a collaboration commitment and pledged funding for its 100% Hydrogen Ultra Low NOx burner project from Southern California Gas Co. This comes on top of the SBIR program Phase 2 Award for $1.6m from the DOE. The company has one year’s cash on hand, according to Deller.

Hydrogen blending increases the output of NOx emissions, which are heavily regulated, Deller explained. A 20% hydrogen blend with fuel gas, for example, causes a 40% increase in NOx emissions.

The goal of the project with SoCalGas is to develop NOx hydrogen burner technology, which the company believes will enable the adoption of hydrogen fuel for industrial heating.

“Your NOx permit is not going to change,” he said. “In order to use even a small amount of hydrogen in your fuel gas, you need a technology that’s going to allow you to maintain NOx emissions for an efficient price.”

Deller said he sees ClearSign as an enabler of the hydrogen transition, pointing to SoCalGas’ need to keep their clients compliant with their operating permits.

“They’re going to have to modify their technology to enable the combustion of hydrogen without exceeding their NOx permits, and that’s where we come in.”

A ‘pivotal point’

ClearSign is open to discussing partnerships and financial options to scale deployment of its technology, Deller said, pointing to potential markets in Texas and the Pacific Northwest.

“We’re certainly open to any company that has a compatible technology,” Deller said.

ClearSign is not engaged for M&A now, but it does have discussions with prospective financial advisors, company spokesperson Matthew Selinger said. “Like any small company, if we had more money we could potentially accelerate faster.”

The company is not considering a spin off now, Deller said, focusing instead on getting traction commercially. ClearSign has not historically taken on debt. Those types of business opportunities are not off the table, but technical synergy and strategic partnerships are first pursued for value creation.

“We’re at a pivotal point, I believe, in the development of our technology,” Deller said. “I’m open to talk about any ideas.”

A technology in development

The burner technology is also applicable to systems that use only hydrogen, Deller said. The Phase 2 DOE grant funding is meant to develop a full range of commercial burners that will operate through a range of fuel gasses up to and including 100% hydrogen.

ClearSign does not have additional partnerships pending announcement, Deller said. But what’s applicable in Southern California is relevant to discussions happening in proposed hydrogen hubs around the country.

The company is headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, along with process burner manufacturing partner Zeeco. It uses third-party manufacturing and will continue to do so, Deller said.

ClearSign also has offices in Seattle and Beijing. The company’s US and Chinese businesses to not have a materials shipping relationship, Deller said. The model followed has manufacturing separated between countries.

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Exclusive: Hydrogen adoption and production firm prepping capital raise

A decarbonization services provider is in development on multiple utility-owned hydrogen adoption projects in the Northeast, Texas and Georgia and is preparing to launch a capital raise in 3Q24.

Celadyne, a Chicago-based decarbonization and hydrogen solutions company, will launch a Series A this year as it continues its role in the development of several utility-owned hydrogen adoption projects in the US, founder and CEO Gary Ong told ReSource.

A $20m to $30m capital raise will likely launch in 3Q24, Ong said. The company is relying on existing investors from its recent seed round to advise, and the amount could change based on grants.

While the $4.5m seed round allowed the company to focus on transportation mobility, the Series A will be used to do more work on hydrogen production, so the company will be looking for strategics in oil and gas, renewable energy, and utilities.

DLA Piper is the company’s legal advisor, Ong said.

Celadyne has a contract signed with a utility in the Northeast for a small electrolysis demonstration and, following that, a multimillion-dollar project. Discussions on how to finance that latter project are underway.

Additional electrolysis projects in Texas and Georgia are in later discussions, while less mature deals are taking shape with a nuclear customer in Illinois and another project in Southern California, Ong said.

Fuel cell customers (typically OEMs that use hydrogen) to which Celadyne ships equipment are clustered mostly in Vancouver, Michigan and California.

Meanwhile, Celadyne has generated revenues from military contracts of about $1m, Ong said, a source of non-recurring revenue that has prodded the company to look for a fuel cell integration partner specific to the defense application.

‘Blocking hydrogen’

The company, founded in 2019, is focused on solving for the demand and supply issues for which the fledgling US hydrogen market is notorious. Thus, it is split-focused between hydrogen adoption and production.

Celadyne has developed a nanoparticle coating that can be applied to existing fuel cell and electrolyzer membranes.

On the heavy-duty side, such as diesel generators or back-up power, the company improves durability of engines between 3X and 5X, Ong said.

On the electrolysis side, the technology improves rote efficiency by 15%. In production, Celadyne is looking for pilot projects and verification studies.

“We’re very good at blocking hydrogen,” he said. “In a fuel cell or electrolyzer, when you have hydrogen on one side and oxygen on the other side, you need something to make sure the hydrogen never sees the oxygen,” noting that it improves safety, reduces side reaction chemistry and improves efficiency.

Hydrogen adoption now will lead to green proliferation later should the economics prove out, according to Ong. If not, blue hydrogen and other decarbonized sources will still pave the way to climate stability.

The only negative for that is the apparent cost-floor for blue hydrogen in fuel cell technologies, Ong said, as carbon capture can only be so cost efficient.

“So, if the price floor is say, $3.25 or $3.50 per kg, it doesn’t mean that you cannot use it for things like transportation, it just means that it might be hard to use it for things like shipping, where the fuel just has to be cheaper,” Ong said.

Three companies

Celadyne is split into three focus applications: defense, materials, and production. If only one of those wings works, Ong said he could see selling to a strategic at some point.

“If any of those things work out, we ought to become a billion-dollar company,” he said.

If all three work out, Ong will likely seek to do an IPO.

An acquisition could be driven by an acquiror that can help Celadyne commercialize its products faster, he said.

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