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ENEOS to develop commercial scale LOHC project

ENEOS will use technology from Honeywell to develop a commercial scale liquid organic hydrogen carrier project.

Honeywell today announced that ENEOS, a leading energy company in Japan, will develop the world’s first commercial scale Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) project using Honeywell’s solution at multiple sites.

The LOHC solution enables the long-distance transportation of clean hydrogen and can help meet the growing requirements for hydrogen use across various industries by leveraging existing refining assets and infrastructure.

“With more cost-effective long-distance transport, our Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier provides a method of more closely matching international supply and demand for hydrogen which enables hydrogen to play a critical role in the energy mix as we move toward lower-carbon economies,” said Ken West, president and CEO of Honeywell Energy and Sustainability Solutions, in a news release. “By providing solutions to help overcome the challenges of hydrogen transportation, Honeywell is supporting ENEOS in transitioning to a hydrogen-powered future.”

This is one of multiple hydrogen transportation projects on which Honeywell and ENEOS are collaborating. In the Honeywell LOHC solution, hydrogen gas is combined chemically through the Honeywell Toluene Hydrogenation process into methylcyclohexane (MCH) – a convenient liquid carrier – compatible with existing infrastructure. The hydrogen at these sites will be exported – in the same way as petrochemical products – to ENEOS in Japan in the form of MCH. Once at its destination, the hydrogen will be recovered using the Honeywell MCH Dehydrogenation process and released for use, while the toluene can be sent back for additional cycles.

Hydrogen is expected to play a critical role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. At standard conditions, hydrogen is a flammable gas with low density and cannot be efficiently or easily transported. Current solutions available for transporting hydrogen include liquifying the hydrogen and using chemical carriers such as ammonia, each of which requires additional infrastructure to produce and transport hydrogen.

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Mitsubishi to participate in Louisiana DAC project

Mitsubishi will join a DAC project in Louisiana, where Shell is leading engineering and deployment.

Mitsubishi Corporation will participate in the Pelican Gulf Coast Carbon Removal Project, according to a news release.

The project, whose participants include Louisiana State University, Shell, and the University of Houston, aims to eliminate 1 million tons of CO2 annually through DAC and underground storage.

The US Department of Energy awarded a grant for the project feasibility study in 2023.

Through the project, MC collaborates with multiple third-party DAC technology companies in order to identify innovative technologies anticipated to substantially lower costs, advancing the technology maturation through detailed evaluation and engineering works with the goal of facilitating the early commercialization of DAC.
This project will be in collaboration with Shell US Gas & Power, who is leading the overall engineering and deployment as part of the project. The project scope centers on a feasibility study that includes evaluating the performance of multiple DAC technologies by demonstrations, supporting DAC technology companies as they design deployments, investing in prioritized distinct DAC technologies, and identifying opportunities to reduce the energy, water, and land resources required for carbon removal, as well as defining the technology needs for future deployment at scale.
MC is committed to contributing to the achievement of a carbon-neutral society. This includes plans to utilize captured CO2 as feedstock for producing synthetic fuels such as e-natural gas and Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) on a long-term basis, while also aiming for the global expansion of the DAC business.
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NET Power and Rice Acquisition garner additional $275m PIPE commitments

The original transaction in December concerns NET Power’s 300 MW Serial Number 1 project near Odessa, Texas.

ET Power and Rice Acquisition Corp. II have announced an additional $275m of PIPE commitments in connection with their proposed business combination, according to a news release.

Occidental has increased its commitment to the PIPE by $250m, bringing its total investment to $350m, while the Rice family has committed an additional $25m, bringing their total investment to $125m.

“We believe NET Power’s technology can accelerate emissions reductions in our existing operations and ultimately supply emissions-free power to the Direct Air Capture facilities and sequestration hubs we are developing, the release states.”

The new commitments bring the expected gross proceeds of the business combination to $845m for NET Power, consisting of approximately $345m from RONI’s trust account (assuming no redemptions), and approximately $500m from the PIPE raised entirely at $10 per share of common stock.

Assuming no RONI shareholders exercise their redemption rights, the combined company is expected to have a market capitalization in excess of $2bn.

“Since announcing the transaction in December 2022, NET Power has continued to make excellent progress towards commercialization of its utility-scale power plant, including FEED commencement on the Occidental-hosted Serial Number 1 (“SN1”) project near Odessa, Texas,” the release states. “In support of the plant, NET Power expects Occidental will be a key offtaker of the clean power generated by SN1.”

It is anticipated that Occidental will manage the transportation, storage, and utilization of the captured CO2 from SN1.

“We believe NET Power’s technology can accelerate emissions reductions in our existing operations and ultimately supply emissions-free power to the Direct Air Capture facilities and sequestration hubs we are developing,” Vicki Hollub, president and CEO of Occidental, said in the release.

Following this additional commitment, Occidental’s ownership stake in the combined company will increase to approximately 39%, assuming no redemptions.

NET Power expects $200m of net proceeds from the business combination and the PIPE to fully fund corporate operations through commercialization of SN1, which is expected to be operational in 2026.

The net proceeds above $200m are expected to support SN1 capital needs and future commercial origination efforts.

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HydrogenPro raises equity in private placement

Norway’s HydrogenPro has raised almost $8m in a private placement with international technology group ANDRITZ AG.

Norway-based HydrogenPro ASA has secured NOK 82.7m ($7.65m) in new equity through a private placement of new shares towards ANDRITZ AG, an international technology group listed on the Vienna stock exchange and one of the leading companies within green hydrogen plants and solutions.

HydrogenPro embarked on a new trajectory in August last year, expanding its presence in the United States and seeking strategic partnerships and alternative funding sources, according to a news release.

Jarle Dragvik, CEO of HydrogenPro, comments: “We are delighted to strengthen the ANDRITZ partnership as we continue to execute on our vision of delivering sustainable hydrogen solutions globally. They bring valuable industrial expertise as one of the leading actors within green hydrogen plants and solutions. Thanks to the partnership with Andritz and their EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) capability, HydrogenPro will together with Andritz achieve full scope delivery, fulfilling requirements of many customers in the large-scale electrolysis sector.”

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Waste-to-energy company interviewing advisors for strategic capital raise

Vancouver-based Klean Industries plans to run a process to raise between $250m – $500m of capital to deploy into projects, some of which would use green hydrogen to upgrade recovered fuel and pyrolysis oils.

Waste-to-energy specialist Klean Industries is interviewing financial advisors and planning to run a process to find investors for a strategic capital raise.

The Vancouver-based company is seeking to raise between $250m – $500m in a minority stake sale that would value the company around $1bn, Klean CEO Jesse Klinkhamer said in an interview.

Klean had previously intended to list on the NASDAQ exchange but those plans were nixed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, he said. The company still plans to list publicly in 2024 or 2025.

Proceeds from a capital raise now would be used to “rapidly deploy” into the projects that Klean is advancing around the globe, Klinkhamer said.

For one of those projects – a flagship tire pyrolysis plant in Boardman, Oregon – Klean is raising non-recourse debt to finance construction, the executive said. Klinkhammer declined to name the advisor for the project financing but said news would be out soon and added that the company has aligned itself with infrastructure funds willing to provide non-recourse debt for the facility.

The Boardman project, which is expected to cost roughly $135m, is an expansion of an existing site where Klean will use its advanced thermal conversion technology to recover fuel oil, steel, and refined carbon black from recycled tires. The end products are comparable to virgin commodities with the exception of being more cost-effective with a lower carbon footprint.

“A lot of what we do is of paramount interest to a lot of the ESG-focused infrastructure investors that are focused on assets that tick all the boxes,” Klinkhamer said, noting the consistent output of the waste-to-energy plants that Klean is building along with predictable prices for energy sourced from renewable power.

Klean has also partnered with H2Core Systems, a maker of containerized green hydrogen production plants, and Enapter, an electrolyzer manufacturer. The company will install a 1 MW electrolyzer unit at the Boardman facility, with the green hydrogen used to upgrade recovered fuel oil and pyrolysis oil into e-fuels that meet California’s Low Carbon Fuels Standards.

“We were exploring how we could improve the quality of the tire pyrolysis oil so that it could enter the LCFS market in California,” he said, “because there are significant carbon credits and tax incentives associated with the improved product.”

The company received proposals from industrial gas companies to bring hydrogen to the Boardman facility that were not feasible, and Klean opted for producing electrolytic hydrogen on site in part due to the abundance of low-cost hydroelectric power and water from the nearby Columbia River.

Addressable market

Discussing Klean’s addressable market for waste-to-energy projects, Klinkhamer points to Japan as an example of a comparable “mature” market.

Japan, an island nation of 126 million people, has built roughly 5,000 resource recovery, waste-to-energy plants of various scopes and designations, he notes. For comparison, the United Kingdom – another island nation of 67 million people – has just 20 waste-to-energy plants.

“The opportunity for waste-to-energy in the UK alone is mind boggling,” he said. “There are a thousand opportunities of scope and scale. Nevermind you’ve got an aging, outdated electrical infrastructure, limited landfills, landfill taxes rising – a tsunami of issues, plus the ESG advent.”

A similar opportunity exists in North America, he noted, where there are around 100 waste-to-energy plants for 580 million people. The company is working on additional tire, plastic, and waste-to-energy projects in North America, and also has projects in Australia and Europe.

Hydrogen could be the key to advancing more projects: waste-to-energy plants have typically been hamstrung by a reliance on large utilities to convert energy generated from waste into electricity, which is in turn dependent on transmission. But the plants could instead produce hydrogen, which can be more easily and cost effectively distributed, Klinkhamer said.

“There is now an opportunity to build these same plants, but rather than rely on the electrical side of things where you’re dealing with a utility, to convert that energy into hydrogen and distribute it to the marketplace,” he added.

Hydrogen infrastructure

Klinkhamer says the company is also examining options for participating in a network of companies that could transform the logistics for bringing feedstock to the Boardman facility and taking away the resulting products.

The company has engaged in talks with long-haul truckers as well as refining companies and industrial gas providers about creating a network of hydrogen hubs – akin to a “Tesla network” – that would support transportation logistics.

“It made sense for us to look at opportunities for moving our feedstock via hydrogen-powered vehicles, and also have refueling stations and hydrogen production plants that we build in North America,” he said.

Klean would need seven to 12 different hubs to supply its transportation network, Klinkhamer estimates, while the $350m price tag for the infrastructure stems from the geographic reach of the hubs as well as the sheer volume of hydrogen required for fueling needs.

“With the Inflation Reduction Act, the U.S. has set itself up to be the lowest-cost producer of hydrogen in the world, which will really spur the development of hydrogen logistics for getting hydrogen out,” he said. “And to get to scale, it’s going to require some big investments.”

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Exclusive: Wisconsin RNG portfolio for sale with large renewables portfolio

A major Canadian utility is auctioning off four Wisconsin RNG assets as part of a larger renewables selldown. The subsidiary at auction has previously indicated that it would take part in Northeastern US hydrogen development.

Algonquin Power & Utilities is selling a package of four renewable natural gas assets, totaling 532 mmbtu, in Wisconsin as part of a larger renewables auction, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

JP Morgan is advising on the process, codenamed Project Power, the sources said.

The process comprises mostly operational onshore wind (2,325 MW) and solar (670 MW), along with an 8 GW development pipeline across 10 power markets, according to a teaser seen by ReSource. The renewable assets are collectively known as Liberty under the Algonquin banner.

The pipeline includes 1,600 mmbtu of RNG. The operational RNG assets reached COD in 2022.

Algonquin did not respond to requests for comment. JP Morgan declined comment.

The Wisconsin assets are apparently the former Sandhill Advanced Biofuels projects, which were acquired by Algonquin in 2022.

When that acquisition was made, it was announced that Liberty had signed on as a “hydrogen ecosystem partner” in the multi-state Northeast Regional Clean Hydrogen Hub. That hub ultimately was not selected by the US department of Energy for hub funding.

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Exclusive: Coal bed methane producer seeking capital partners

A western US company producing RNG by injecting biomass into coal seams is preparing a Series B and has a line of site to financing and contracting EPC for a series of projects in western coal fields.

Cowboy Clean Fuels, a Wyoming-based RNG producer, is preparing to launch a Series B to reach commercialization, CEO Ryan Waddington told ReSource.

CCF injects biomass feedstock like molasses into the coal seams of spent coal mines about 1,000 ft. below surface, relying on the endogenous microorganisms living in those seams to produce methane, Waddington said. Capex on projects is low, up to $6m each.

The company raised $10m in a Series A and will seek to raise that same amount for a Series B. The company has been assisted by Syren Capital Advisors.

Projects are set up as separate entities under the parent, Waddington said. Six projects, each ranging from 70 to 300 wells, are in the company’s pipeline now in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana.

“We can replicate this 1,000 times,” Waddington said of the immense number of available wells in the region, which can be acquired cheaply. Additional growth could come in the San Juan region of New Mexico, where coal capacity is being retired quickly.

The fuels could be sold as renewable diesel into markets with incentives, like California’s LCFS, Waddington said. The renewable fuel is significantly (10X) more expensive than natural gas produced as a by-product of oil production. But, CCF is not looking to participate in the LCFS program or the EPA-run RFS program.

“The voluntary market for RNG has really taken off,” he said. A contract for renewable diesel offtake is pending with a Wyoming-based oil and gas company looking to lower its CI score.

CCF’s projects are much larger than a typical RNG project, Waddington said; the first project will produce at some 700 cfpy and include 185 tons of CCS. CCF is looking for EPC providers now.

The executive team of CCF has a minority position of the company, Waddington said. The founders and the management team together have a majority position.

The company’s first 139-well project in Wyoming is awaiting final approval from the federal Bureau of Land Management.

CCF is primarily VC-backed to date. The company received approximately $7.8m through the Energy Matching Funds program of the Wyoming Energy Authority early this year.

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