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Exclusive: Green hydrogen firm developing pilot project amid Series A

A provider of on-site green hydrogen generation and storage has partnered with an oil major for its first major project in North America and is in the process of raising capital following an earlier seed round.

Power to Hydrogen, the Columbus, Ohio-based provider of on-site green hydrogen production and storage, has partnered with an oil major to develop its first industrial-pilot project in Canada and is raising public and private funding following a seed round completed last year, according to sources familiar with the matter.

Power to Hydrogen also has an unannounced project development at a port on Europe’s North Sea, and plans to hire a CFO in the near term.

Shell is partnering with the company on an industrial project near Detroit, across the border in Canada, a source said. The project has not yet been made public.

The company has raised around $8.5m to date, and is running a new equity raise up to $12m aimed at strategic and financial investors including existing backers. That raise could be scaled back based on an award from the Department of Energy, which the company is expecting to receive.

Founded in 2019, Power to Hydrogen has publicly partnered with AEP and Enel on separate initiatives. In 2020 the company received funding through a Shell startup initiative.

Power to Hydrogen is majority owned by its founders. The company declined to comment.

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New renewable diesel plant transacts at $499m

Camber Energy, a NYSE-traded energy company, has reached a deal to acquire 100% of the interests in New Rise Renewables, the owner of a newly developed renewable diesel plant in Reno, Nevada.

Camber Energy, a NYSE-traded energy company, has reached a deal to acquire 100% of the interests in New Rise Renewables, the owner of a newly developed renewable diesel plant in Reno, Nevada.

The plant, which will produce 43,000,000 gallons per year (5,971,585 MMBTUs) of renewable diesel from triglyceride oils such as corn, was purchased for $499m, representing a purchase price of $750m less $251m of existing company liabilities, according to a securities filing. The seller is RESC Renewables Holdings, a predecessor company to Ryze Renewables, which developed the project.

The renewable diesel produced by New Rise Renewables Reno is completely interchangeable with diesel derived from petroleum and can efficiently power diesel engines, such as semi-trucks and large-scale emergency generators. Phillips 66 is under contract to supply all of the feedstock for New Rise Renewables Reno and will purchase 100% of the renewable diesel product for use and sale nearby in California.

The parties had reached a framework for the deal in late 2021, subject to purchase price adjustments and other closing conditions.

Reno-based Greater Commercial Lending (GCL) facilitated $112.6m in government-guaranteed credit for the development of New Rise Renewables Reno. Eighty percent of the GCL-arranged financing for New Rise Renewables Reno is guaranteed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) via its 9003 Biorefinery, Renewable Chemical and Biodiesel Production Manufacturing Assistance Program. The financing structure includes participation by GCL parent Greater Nevada Credit Union, other credit unions, insurance companies and secondary market groups.

Renewable diesel is made by causing chemical reactions through the addition of hydrogen to the natural fats and oils. New Rise has deployed proven state-of-the-art efficient and cost-effective technology methods, which involves hydrogenating the triglycerides, according to an August news release. The process uses hydrogen, pressure, catalyst and heat in an efficient manner, allowing reactions to be uniform and controlled – increasing yield, lowering operating costs and allowing for feedstock flexibility.

The fuel plant is located in the Tahoe-Reno Industrial Center, the largest industrial park in the world. Other occupants include Tesla, Walmart, Google, FedEx, Switch and Panasonic.

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HydrogenPro raises equity in private placement

Norway’s HydrogenPro has raised almost $8m in a private placement with international technology group ANDRITZ AG.

Norway-based HydrogenPro ASA has secured NOK 82.7m ($7.65m) in new equity through a private placement of new shares towards ANDRITZ AG, an international technology group listed on the Vienna stock exchange and one of the leading companies within green hydrogen plants and solutions.

HydrogenPro embarked on a new trajectory in August last year, expanding its presence in the United States and seeking strategic partnerships and alternative funding sources, according to a news release.

Jarle Dragvik, CEO of HydrogenPro, comments: “We are delighted to strengthen the ANDRITZ partnership as we continue to execute on our vision of delivering sustainable hydrogen solutions globally. They bring valuable industrial expertise as one of the leading actors within green hydrogen plants and solutions. Thanks to the partnership with Andritz and their EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) capability, HydrogenPro will together with Andritz achieve full scope delivery, fulfilling requirements of many customers in the large-scale electrolysis sector.”

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CCUS developer closes 45Q direct transfer deal

A Mercuria Energy-backed CCUS developer has closed a 45Q direct transfer deal with assistance from Marathon Capital.

CapturePoint LLC has closed on a private Section 45Q direct transfer tax credit transaction for carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at the company’s Arkalon facility near Liberal, Kansas and utilized for Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR) operations in the panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas, according to a news release.

The CapturePoint Arkalon CO2 capture facility has the capacity to capture 250,000 metric tons of CO2 annually from nearby bio-ethanol production. CapturePoint transports the captured CO2 through its 170-mile regional network of dedicated CO2 pipelines to over 75 active CO2 injection wells the company uses for CO2-EOR operations. Once CO2-EOR operations cease, the CO2 is ultimately securely stored permanently underground.

The new Arkalon CO2 capture facility was placed in service in April 2023, generating Section 45Q tax credits for capturing and utilizing industrially sourced CO2 emissions. The Tax Credit Transfer Agreement between CapturePoint and the buyer includes placement of 100% of the 45Q tax credits generated by the Arkalon facility for a total of 12 years. At closing, CapturePoint will transfer all 2023-generated 45Q tax credits to the buyer.

“CapturePoint is at the leading edge of carbon management innovation in the United States,” said CEO Tracy Evans, “and our Arkalon CO2 capture facility and Panhandle CO2-EOR operations are helping the nation achieve important environmental and energy security goals. Our team is also developing expansive deep underground carbon storage sites – like our CPS Central Louisiana Regional Carbon Storage Hub — to permanently and safely sequester much larger volumes of CO2 currently released into the atmosphere by industrial emitters.”

The Section 45Q transaction announced today was placed privately by Marathon Capital. ReSource previously interviewed Evans last year about the company’s plans.

“We were honored to support CapturePoint on one of the industry’s first Section 45Q tax credit transfer transactions for their Arkalon CO2 capture facility,” said Matthew Shanahan, Managing Director at Marathon Capital. “We wish the CapturePoint team continued success as a leader in carbon management services.”

With both the Arkalon CO2 capture facility Section 45Q placement and an earlier transaction announced in January 2023 for CO2 captured at a nitrogen fertilizer facility in Coffeyville, Kansas, CapturePoint now has nearly one million metric tons per year of industrially sourced CO2 being utilized in CO2-EOR operations and generating 45Q tax credits.

CapturePoint LLC and its affiliate CapturePoint Solutions LLC offer a wide array of carbon management services and are pioneering the U.S. development of leading-edge carbon solutions including deep underground geologic carbon storage sites. The companies are privately held, with significant financial backing from prominent investors in clean energy innovation including an affiliate of Mercuria Energy, one of the world’s largest independent energy and commodity groups.

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Methanol-to-hydrogen firm planning capital raise

An early-stage provider of distributed methanol-to-hydrogen solutions is planning a capital raise as it scales up.

Kaizen Clean Energy, a Houston-based methanol-to-hydrogen fuel company, is planning to raise additional capital in support of upcoming projects.

The company, which uses methanol and water to produce hydrogen with modular units, recently completed a funding round led by Balcor Companies, in which Balcor took a minority interest in Kaizen.

Additional funding in the capital raise was provided by friends and family, Kaizen co-founder and chief commercial officer Eric Smith said in an interview.

But with its sights on larger project opportunities this year, the company is already targeting an additional capital raise to support continued growth, Smith said. He declined to comment further on the capital raise and potential advisors, but noted that the company’s CFO, Craig Klaasmeyer, is a former Credit Suisse banker.

Kaizen’s methanol model utilizes a generator license from Element 1 and adds in systems to produce power or hydrogen, targeting the diesel generator market, EV charging and microgrids as well as hydrogen fueling and industrial uses.

Compared to trucking in hydrogen, the model using methanol, an abundant chemical, cuts costs by around 50%, Smith said, noting that Kaizen’s containers are at cost parity with diesel.

In addition, the Kaizen container is cleaner than alternatives, producing no nitric or sulfur oxide, according to Smith. Its carbon intensity score is 45, compared to 90 for the California electric grid and 100 for diesel generators.

Smith also touts a streamlined permitting process for Kaizen’s containerized product. The company recently received a letter of exemption for the container from a California air district due to low or no emissions. The product similarly does not require a California state permit and similarly, when off grid, no city permits are required, he added.

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Exclusive: Riverstone Credit spinout preparing $500m fundraise

Breakwall Capital, a new fund put together by former Riverstone Credit fund managers, is preparing to raise $500m to make project loans in decarbonization as well as the traditional energy sector. We spoke to founders Christopher Abbate and Daniel Flannery.

Breakwall Capital is preparing to launch a $500m fundraising effort for a new fund – called Breakwall Energy Credit I – that will focus on investments in decarbonization as well as the traditional energy sector.

The founders of the new fund, Christopher Abbate, Daniel Flannery, and Jamie Brodsky, have spent the last 10 years making oil and gas credit investments at Riverstone Credit, while pivoting in recent years to investments in sustainability and decarbonization.

In addition to bringing in fresh capital, Breakwall will manage funds raised from Dutch trading firm Vitol, for a fund called Valor Upstream Credit Partners; and the partners will help wind down the remaining roughly $1bn of investments held in two Riverstone funds.

Drawing on their experience at Riverstone, Breakwall will continue to make investments through sustainability-linked loans across the energy value chain, but will also invest in the upstream oil and gas sector through Valor and the new Breakwall fund.

“We’re not abandoning the conventional hydrocarbon economy,” Flannery said in an interview. “We’re embracing the energy transition economy and we’re doing it all with the same sort of mindset that everything we do is encouraging our borrowers to be more sustainable.”

In splitting from Riverstone Credit, where they made nearly $6bn of investments, the founders of Breakwall said they have maintained cordial relations, such that Breakwall will seek to tap some of the same LPs that invested in Riverstone. The partners have also lined up a revenue sharing arrangement with Riverstone so that interests are aligned on fund management.

The primary reason for the spinout, according to Abbate, “was really to give both sides more resources to work with: on their side, less headcount relative to AUM, and on our side, more equity capital to reward people with and incent people with and recruit people with, because Riverstone was not a firm that broadly distributed equity to the team.”

Investment thesis

A typical Breakwall loan deal will involve a small or mid-sized energy company that either can’t get a bank loan or can’t get enough of a bank loan to finance a capital-intensive project. Usually, a considerable amount of equity has already been invested to get the project to a certain maturity level, and it needs a bridge to completion.

“We designed our entire investment philosophy around being a transitional credit capital provider to these companies who only needed our cost of capital for a very specific period of time,” Flannery said.

Breakwall provides repayable short-duration bridge-like solutions to these growing energy companies that will eventually take out the loan with a lower cost of capital or an asset sale, or in the case of an upstream business, pay them off with cash flow.

“We’re solving a need that exists because there’s been a flock of capital away from the upstream universe,” he added.

Often, Breakwall loan deals, which come at pricing in the SOFR+ 850bps range, will be taken out by the leveraged loan or high yield market at lower pricing in the SOFR+ 350bps range, once a project comes online, Abbate said. 

Breakwall’s underwriting strategy, as such, evaluates a project’s chances of success and the obstacles to getting built. 

The partners point to a recent loan to publicly listed renewable natural gas producer Clean Energy – a four-year $150m sustainability-linked senior secured term loan – as one of their most successful, where most of the proceeds were used to build RNG facilities. Sustainability-linked loans tie loan economics to key performance indicators (KPIs) aimed at incentivizing cleaner practices.

In fact, in clean fuels, their investment thesis centers on the potential of RNG as a viable solution for sectors like long-haul trucking, where electrification may present challenges. 

“We are big believers in RNG,” Flannery said. “We believe that the combination of the demand and the credit regimes in certain jurisdictions make that a very compelling investment thesis.”

EPIC loan

In another loan deal, the Breakwall partners previously financed the construction of EPIC Midstream’s propane pipeline from Corpus Christi east to Sweeny, Texas.

Originally a $150m project, Riverstone provided $75m of debt, while EPIC committed the remaining capital, with COVID-induced cost overruns leading to a total of $95m of equity provided by the midstream company. 

The only contract the propane project had was a minimum volume commitment with EPIC’s Y-Grade pipeline, because the Y-Grade pipeline, which ran to the Robstown fractionator near Corpus Christi, needed an outlet to the Houston petrochemical market, as there wasn’t enough export demand out of Corpus Christi.

“So critical infrastructure: perfect example of what we do, because if your only credit is Y-Grade, you’re just a derivative to the Y-Grade cost of capital,” Abbate said.

Asked if Breakwall would look at financing the construction of a 500-mile hydrogen pipeline that EPIC is evaluating, Abbate answered affirmatively.

“If those guys called me and said, ‘Hey, we want to build this 500-mile pipeline,’ I’d look at it,” he said. “I have to see what the contracts look like, but that’s exactly what type of project we would like to look at.”

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Exclusive: California IPP considering hydrogen options for gas generation portfolio

A California-based IPP is considering burning hydrogen in the thermal plants it acquires, as well as in a portfolio of gas peaking assets it is developing in Texas and the western US.

Nightpeak Energy, the Oakland-based IPP backed by Energy Spectrum Capital, is planning to have wide optionality to burn hydrogen in the gas plants it acquires, as well as in quick-start peaking natural gas assets it is developing in Texas and the western US, CEO Paris Hays said in an interview.

“There’s just not a lot of places in this country where you can procure enough hydrogen at a reasonable price to actually serve wholesale electricity customers,” Hays said of the existing hydrogen landscape.

Still, OEMs are figuring out in real time which of their deployed fleet can burn hydrogen, he said. Studies on blending seem to be yielding positive results.

“That’s great news for a business like ours, because we can have optionality,” Hays said. When interacting with equipment providers, conversion to hydrogen is an important, if expensive, discussion point.

“We want to be in a position to be able to do that for our customers,” Hays said. “We can offer a premium product, which is kind of rare in our business.”

Nightpeak recently purchased Saguaro Power Co., which owns a 90 MW combined cycle power plant in Nevada. That facility is a candidate for hydrogen repowering, Hays said, though that’s just one option for an asset that is currently cash-flowing well.

The Nevada facility is close to California, which notably is a market with a demonstrated appetite for paying green premiums, Hays said.

“We wouldn’t manufacture hydrogen ourselves, we would be a buyer,” he said. “This is one path that any plants we own or develop could take in the future.”

Nightpeak has yet to announce any greenfield projects. But Hays said the company is developing a portfolio of “quick-start” natural gas generation projects in ERCOT and WECC. Those assets, 100 MW or more, are to be developed with the concept of hydrogen conversion or blending in mind.

Proposition 7, which recently passed in Texas, could present an opportunity for Nightpeak as the legislation’s significant provisions for natural gas development has pundits and some lawmakers calling for the assets to be hydrogen-ready.

Investor interest in being able to convert gas assets to burn hydrogen reflect an important decision-making process for Nightpeak, Hays said.

“Does it makes sense to just buy a turbine that only burns natural gas and may be a stranded asset at some point, or would we rather pay and select a turbine that already has the optionality?” Hays said. “Putting price aside, you’re always going to go for optionality.”

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