Resource logo with tagline

Heidelburg Materials receives Canadian government support for cement CCS

The Texas-based company is actively developing a carbon capture utilization and storage facility at its cement production operations in Alberta.

Heidelberg Materials has completed an MOU with the Government of Canada to support development of a carbon capture utilization and storage facility at the company’s Edmonton cement production operations, according to a news release.

Heidelberg Materials North America, based in Irving, Texas, anticipates the new facility being operational by late 2026. It will capture more than 1 million tonnes of CO2 annually from its Edmonton cement production facility and the combined heat and power facility that is integrated with the capture process.

A project feasibility study was first announced in 2019 and received a CAD $1.4m contribution from Emissions Reduction Alberta and was completed in 2021. Heidelberg Materials committed a further CAD $25. in 3Q22 to support the front-end engineering and design processes.

Heidelberg Materials was the first company in the cement sector to have its targets endorsed by the Science Based Targets Initiative in 2019.

Unlock this article

The content you are trying to view is exclusive to our subscribers.
To unlock this article:

You might also like...

OMERS exec joins CCS project developer

Former managing partner and head of ventures at OMERS Ventures Damien Steel has joined a Montreal-based CCS developer as CEO.

Deep Sky, a Montreal-based venture commercializing carbon removal and storage solutions at scale, today announced that Damien Steel will take the helm as CEO.

Most recently, Steel served as managing partner and global head of ventures at Toronto-based OMERS Ventures (OV), part of one of Canada’s largest pension plans. There, he was responsible for investments, fund operations, and strategic global oversight of the group. During his tenure, he tripled the size of the platform to $2.5bn in assets while generating strong growth. Previously, he held roles with BridgeScale Partners and EdgeStone Capital Partners. Before joining OV, Damien was a healthcare entrepreneur, founding and selling a digital dental laboratory startup. He also serves on the board of tech disruptors, including Hopper, TouchBistro, Hootsuite and DuckDuckGo. Alongside his new CEO role at Deep Sky, Damien will remain a senior advisor to OMERS Ventures.

Steel brings significant finance, climate, infrastructure, and corporate governance experience in the highly regulated Canadian pension business to the position. In 2022, he led the early stage investment into a Toronto-based climate tech startup and gained first-hand insight into how businesses globally are prioritizing climate risk. Steel also led OV’s largest and most successful investment in travel app, Hopper, also started by Deep Sky founders Fred Lalonde and Joost Ouwerkerk. Through his work with Hopper in recent years, Damien has become increasingly committed to tackling the climate crisis.

“For nearly two decades I’ve had the privilege of supporting world class founders in their efforts to build world class companies,” said Steel. “At Deep Sky, I hope to apply all that I’ve learned from these great visionaries to what I believe is the greatest challenge facing humanity today – climate change inaction.”

“Building an ambitious company to reverse climate change requires an equally ambitious, big thinker at the helm,” said Deep Sky Co-Founder Fred Lalonde. “Damien is a proven visionary, leader, fundraiser, and operator who can catapult Deep Sky’s growth to meet the urgent threat that climate change presents. In working together since 2012, he’s demonstrated an uncanny knack for spotting the next moonshot that withstands the test of time. I’m pleased that he’s recognized Deep Sky as his next big bet.”

Deep Sky is working to build large-scale carbon removal and storage infrastructure in Canada. Acting as a project developer, the company is bringing together the most promising direct air and ocean capture technologies to deliver the largest supply of high quality carbon credits to the market. Powered by renewable energy, Deep Sky’s facilities are strategically located in Quebec, a region with an abundance of hydroelectric power, immense wind power potential and a vast territory with the rich geological makeup required for carbon capture.

Read More »

Fusion Fuel US leaders to step down

Portugal-based Fusion Fuel’s US co-presidents are stepping down to pursue other opportunities in the hydrogen and clean fuels sector.

Zachary Steele and Jason Baran have decided to leave Fusion Fuel and will be stepping down from their roles of Co-Head and Chief Commercial Officer, respectively, as well as Co-Presidents of the Americas, to pursue other opportunities in the hydrogen and clean fuels sector.

The moves were announced as part of the company’s 1Q23 earnings release.

Steele said in an interview late last year that the company was working with RBC Capital Markets to develop projects in the US.

Read More »

Exclusive: CarbonFree raising capital for U.S. Steel carbon utilization project

CarbonFree, an established carbon capture utilization firm, is raising capital for its $150m plant at U.S. Steel’s Gary, Indiana steelmaking facilities.

CarbonFree, an established carbon capture and utilization firm, is raising capital to build a $150m capture and utilization plant at U.S. Steel’s Gary Works Blast Furnaces.

The San Antonio-based firm already generates revenues from existing projects, and will use cash on hand as well as additional private investments to fund construction of the project, a spokesperson for the company said via email.

We are pursuing additional equity investments in CarbonFree, rather than project-specific financing,” the spokesperson said. “The process is ongoing.”

The company is working with a financial advisor on the capital raise, but the spokesperson declined to name the firm.

CarbonFree and U.S. Steel announced this week that they have finalized a definitive agreement to use CarbonFree’s SkyCycle technology to capture and mineralize up to 50,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Construction is expected to begin as soon as this summer with operations expected by 2026.

The technology captures carbon emissions and converts them into a carbon-neutral calcium carbonate, used to make paper, plastics, and other products.

CarbonFree CEO Martin Keighley said in previous interviews that the objective of the CCU operation is that “it can be zero capital and zero OpEx for the emitter, because, in its own right, it is a profitable operation.”

The spokesperson estimated the addressable market for the calcium carbonate it produces to be $40bn, and added that CarbonFree was actively seeking new partners in that market.

Read More »
exclusive

Buckeye Partners closes acquisition of Bear Head Energy

Buckeye Partners has closed on the acquisition of Bear Head Energy.

Buckeye Partners has closed on the acquisition of Bear Head Energy, Inc., according to a news release.

Bear Head is developing a large-scale green hydrogen and ammonia production, storage and export project in Point Tupper, Nova Scotia with hydrogen electrolyzer capacity of more than 2 GW.

As part of the project’s phased development, Buckeye plans to partner with on-shore and off-shore renewable energy developers to build out a large-scale green hydrogen hub for Atlantic Canada.

Buckeye established its Alternative Energy operating segment as a clean energy business that focuses on the development, construction, and operation of alternative energy projects, including hydrogen, wind, and solar-powered energy solutions.

Read More »

Exclusive: Hydrogen adoption and production firm prepping capital raise

A decarbonization services provider is in development on multiple utility-owned hydrogen adoption projects in the Northeast, Texas and Georgia and is preparing to launch a capital raise in 3Q24.

Celadyne, a Chicago-based decarbonization and hydrogen solutions company, will launch a Series A this year as it continues its role in the development of several utility-owned hydrogen adoption projects in the US, founder and CEO Gary Ong told ReSource.

A $20m to $30m capital raise will likely launch in 3Q24, Ong said. The company is relying on existing investors from its recent seed round to advise, and the amount could change based on grants.

While the $4.5m seed round allowed the company to focus on transportation mobility, the Series A will be used to do more work on hydrogen production, so the company will be looking for strategics in oil and gas, renewable energy, and utilities.

DLA Piper is the company’s legal advisor, Ong said.

Celadyne has a contract signed with a utility in the Northeast for a small electrolysis demonstration and, following that, a multimillion-dollar project. Discussions on how to finance that latter project are underway.

Additional electrolysis projects in Texas and Georgia are in later discussions, while less mature deals are taking shape with a nuclear customer in Illinois and another project in Southern California, Ong said.

Fuel cell customers (typically OEMs that use hydrogen) to which Celadyne ships equipment are clustered mostly in Vancouver, Michigan and California.

Meanwhile, Celadyne has generated revenues from military contracts of about $1m, Ong said, a source of non-recurring revenue that has prodded the company to look for a fuel cell integration partner specific to the defense application.

‘Blocking hydrogen’

The company, founded in 2019, is focused on solving for the demand and supply issues for which the fledgling US hydrogen market is notorious. Thus, it is split-focused between hydrogen adoption and production.

Celadyne has developed a nanoparticle coating that can be applied to existing fuel cell and electrolyzer membranes.

On the heavy-duty side, such as diesel generators or back-up power, the company improves durability of engines between 3X and 5X, Ong said.

On the electrolysis side, the technology improves rote efficiency by 15%. In production, Celadyne is looking for pilot projects and verification studies.

“We’re very good at blocking hydrogen,” he said. “In a fuel cell or electrolyzer, when you have hydrogen on one side and oxygen on the other side, you need something to make sure the hydrogen never sees the oxygen,” noting that it improves safety, reduces side reaction chemistry and improves efficiency.

Hydrogen adoption now will lead to green proliferation later should the economics prove out, according to Ong. If not, blue hydrogen and other decarbonized sources will still pave the way to climate stability.

The only negative for that is the apparent cost-floor for blue hydrogen in fuel cell technologies, Ong said, as carbon capture can only be so cost efficient.

“So, if the price floor is say, $3.25 or $3.50 per kg, it doesn’t mean that you cannot use it for things like transportation, it just means that it might be hard to use it for things like shipping, where the fuel just has to be cheaper,” Ong said.

Three companies

Celadyne is split into three focus applications: defense, materials, and production. If only one of those wings works, Ong said he could see selling to a strategic at some point.

“If any of those things work out, we ought to become a billion-dollar company,” he said.

If all three work out, Ong will likely seek to do an IPO.

An acquisition could be driven by an acquiror that can help Celadyne commercialize its products faster, he said.

Read More »

Exclusive: Advanced Ionics raising $12.5m, seeking pilot project partners

Advanced Ionics, an electrolyzer developer based in the Midwest, is approaching a close on the second tranche of its Series A and is seeking sponsors for pilot projects in Texas and elsewhere.

The company’s Symbiotic electrolyzers use steam by tapping into excess heat from industrial settings, thereby lowering electricity needs for water splitting to 35 kWh per kg, with 30 kWh per kg possible. That compares to industry averages over 50 kWh per kg.

Advanced Ionics, the Milwaukee-based electrolyzer developer, is about six weeks out from closing a second tranche of its Series A and is seeking new partnerships for pilot projects in the US, Chief Commercial Officer Ignacio Bincaz told ReSource.

Bincaz, based in Houston, is working to close the second $12.5m tranche, which is roughly the same size as the first tranche. The company has technical teams in Wisconsin but could build out those as well as commercial capabilities in Houston.
The company’s Symbiotic electrolyzers use steam by tapping into excess heat from industrial settings, thereby lowering electricity needs for water splitting to 35 kWh per kg, with 30 kWh per kg possible. That compares to industry averages over 50 kWh per kg.

“We just put together our first stack, Generation One, which are 100 square centimeters,” Bincaz said. Generation Two stacks will come later this year, but to get to Generation Three — commercial size, producing between 7 and 16 tons per day — the company will have to conduct a Series B about one year from now.

“For that, we need to hit certain benchmarks on durability of a stack,” he said. “The money will go toward scaling up and getting the data expected by investors to get us to Series B.”

Aside from equity provisions, Advanced Ionics is looking for sponsors for pilots and related studies, Bincaz said. “There’s different ways that we’re looking for collaboration.”

Between 2027 and 2028 the company expects to have commercial-size Generation Three stacks in the market.

Pilot projects

Advanced Ionics has two pilot projects in development with Repsol Foundation and Arpa-E (US Department of Energy), respectively.

The Repsol project is a Generation One development producing 1 kilogram per day, Bincaz said. The government project will be the first Generation Two project.

Another pilot is in development with a large energy company that Bincaz declined to name. The company is also exploring pilot projects with bp, which is an investor in the company.

After four or so pilot projects of ascending scale, the company will look to do its first industrial-scale project using real process heat or steam, integrated into a hydrogen-use process like ammonia manufacturing or chemical refining.

“We’re talking to companies in Asia, companies in Europe, companies in the US,” he said, specifically naming Japan and Singapore. “I’m in early conversations.”

Advanced Ionics’ first tranche Series A was led by bp ventures, with participation from Clean Energy Ventures, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, and GVP Climate.

Read More »

Welcome Back

Get Started

Sign up for a free 15-day trial and get the latest clean fuels news in your inbox.