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HyTerra raising money for Kansas geologic hydrogen activities

Funds will finance drilling exploration for geologic hydrogen on the Nemaha Ridge in Kansas.

Australia-based HyTerra is raising AUD 6.1m for geologic hydrogen activities along the Nemaha Ridge in Kansas, according to an investor release.

Ther firm “is undertaking a capital raising of approximately AUD $6.1 million (before costs) through a placement to sophisticated
and professional investors and a subsequent fully underwritten non-renounceable rights issue to eligible shareholders,” with the funds allocated to execute a multi-well drilling program in Kansas.

HyTerra’s exploration acreage covers over 9,600 acres and is 100% owned and operated.

Hydrogen and helium occurrences have been recovered previously from wellbores within these leases. They are near agricultural and manufacturing facilities that are connected by rail, road and/or pipelines. Within these areas, the Company has identified multiple drilling targets covering a diverse range of geological plays.

HyTerra plans to continue leasing of high-priority acreage and drill two exploration wells. The timing of the drilling program is subject to regulatory and landowner approvals, as well as third-party contractor availability. However, it is HyTerra’s goal to commence drilling in 3Q24, according to the release.

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BayoTech hires VP of development

The new hire, Jack Hedge, will be responsible for leading the development of hydrogen projects in North America.

New Mexico-based BayoTech Hydrogen has hired Jack Hedge as its new vice president of hydrogen hub development, according to a press release.

Hedge will be responsible for leading the development of hydrogen projects in North America. He will lead a team that is developing relationships with host property managers, community stakeholders, regulators, and local government officials who are interested in decarbonization.

“BayoTech is on the verge of making hydrogen production local and hub development is how we achieve it,” said BayoTech President & CEO, Mo Vargas. “Jack has years of experience in developing and executing major projects for some of the most recognized ports in the nation. That experience paired with his dedication to clean energy projects is exactly why we thought he was the right person to lead this phase of growth. We are delighted to have Jack’s leadership, passion for making the world better and experience both as a developer and as a project host to support customers decarbonization goals and drive projects to completion.”

“I am excited to begin this next chapter and blend all my previous experience into something truly meaningful and impactful. Working with the team at BayoTech we will lead the way to truly “smart, sustainable and equitable” supply chains,” Hedge said in the release.

Prior to joining BayoTech, Jack served as president of Utah Inland Port Authority, where he was responsible for developing and building one of the nation’s leading sustainable intermodal logistics hubs. Jack has also worked as the director of cargo and industrial real estate for the Port of Los Angeles where he lead the development, leasing, and asset management functions of the largest container port complex in North America.

BayoTech last year agreed to a memorandum of understanding with Carbon Clean under which the two parties will work togeterh on a demonstration facility to evaluate, design, and operate a carbon capture plant at a BayoTech site in North America which is expected to be operational by the end of 2022.

Investors in BayoTech include Newlight Partners, Opal Fuels, Nutrien, The Yield Lab, Cottonwood Technology Fund, Sun Mountain Capital and Caterpillar Venture Capital Inc.

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Norwegian start-up tests direct ammonia fuel cell system

Alma Clean Power said the 6 kW direct ammonia fuel cell system was the highest power output ever demonstrated with this technology.

Alma Clean Power has successfully tested what it is calling the world’s first 6 kW direct ammonia fuel cell system.

The company is aiming to develop modularized Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems for applications in the ocean space, and the 6-kW unit is the first building block of a complete 100-kW SOFC module. The test validates the company’s design of a direct ammonia fuel cell (DAFC) system, delivering an electrical efficiency of 61-67%, Alma said in a press release.

“I am very proud of the Alma team and their remarkable achievements in just over a year of system development. To our knowledge, this is the highest power output ever demonstrated with direct ammonia solid oxide fuel cells”, says Bernt Skeie, CEO in Alma Clean Power

Alma’s technology enables direct feeding of ammonia into the fuel cell system, bypassing the need for any energy intensive pre-treatment that converts the fuel into hydrogen prior to electricity production. With significantly higher efficiency levels compared to traditional combustion engines, this technology has the potential to make ammonia operated maritime energy systems economically viable for ship owners.

Green ammonia, produced by electrolysis powered by renewables, is a carbon-free fuel with great potential to decarbonize the maritime industries.

Alma’s SOFC system is currently operating seamlessly 24/7 and is monitored remotely with a sophisticated safety and control system. The SOFC modules are combustion-free with no rotating parts. They are designed to operate autonomously without any maintenance need for long intervals.

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Pembina and Marubeni developing Canada-to-Japan blue ammonia project

The project will be structured as an infrastructure-style, fee-based business with investment grade counterparties and is seen as an anchor to a proposed 2,000-acre clean fuels industrial complex in Alberta.

Pembina Pipeline Corporation and Marubeni Corporation have signed an MOU to develop a blue ammonia supply chain from Western Canada to Japan and other Asian markets, according to a news release.

The facility will be on Pembina-owned lands adjacent to its Redwater Complex in the Alberta Industrial Heartland near Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.

Initial feasibility studies have been completed and the facility has an anticipated design capacity of up to 185 kilotonnes per year of hydrogen production, which will be converted into approximately one million tonnes per year of ammonia.

The facility will include carbon capture with the potential for integrated transportation and sequestration on the proposed Alberta Carbon Grid being developed by Pembina and TC Energy.

The ammonia would be transported via rail to Canada’s WestCoast and shipped to Japan and other Asian markets.

Under the MOA, Pembina and Marubeni will focus on the preliminary Front End Engineering Design (pre-FEED), engagement with various stakeholders, including governments in Canada and Japan, and commercial activities.

The project is expected to be structured as an infrastructure-style, fee-based business with investment grade counter parties. Pre-FEED work is currently expected to be completed by early 2024.

The project could potentially serve as an anchor development to advance Pembina’s ongoing efforts to establish a new growth platform known as the Pembina Low Carbon Complex (PLCC) for energy transition technologies, sustainable fuels, and chemicals like hydrogen, ammonia and methanol.

“With over 2,000 contiguous acres of undeveloped land located in the Alberta Industrial Heartland, Pembina’s vision is to develop an industrial complex for low-carbon energy infrastructure to better enable Pembina and third parties to develop projects, while reducing costs, emissions, and risk,” the release states.

Projects within the PLCC would gain access to land, low-carbon hydrogen, clean power, natural gas and industrial gases, water, CCUS, and the construction and operation of rail assets. Within the PLCC, Pembina would lease land to third parties and provide infrastructure, logistics, and shared services to tenants.

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Biomass-to-hydrogen developer in talks for development capital, series A

A California developer that uses woody biomass to make green hydrogen is in discussions to raise capital for project development and a series A funding round.

Yosemite Clean Energy, a California-based biomass-to-hydrogen start-up, is in discussions with potential investors to raise development capital for projects and a series A round.

The company is currently seeking around $20m of development capital that would help advance woody biomass-to-hydrogen projects to FID, CEO Tom Hobby said in an interview.

Hobby said he is also in discussions with strategic capital partners about a series A funding round. The company is not using an advisor for the capital raise, Hobby said, but is working with the law firm Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton.

The company has so far raised less than $2m at the corporate level from friends and family and an additional $5m – including grants – for projects, Hobby added. The development capital as well as the series A raise would be conducted at the project level.

Yosemite has signed a letter of intent and term sheet for offtake from its first project in Oroville, California, which will produce approximately 24,000 kg per day (2,760 MMBtu) of green hydrogen from woody biomass, and is set for FID later this year. Hobby declined to name the offtaker but described it as a “global trading house.”

Hobby, whose family has lived in the Sierra Nevada for generations, emphasizes the company’s role as a partner with local communities to help manage forest waste, which has served as fuel for explosive wildfires in recent years.

“It’s de-risking their communities from catastrophic wildfires,” he said.

Design incentives

Under the original design for the Oroville facility, the company had planned to produce 31,000 kg per day of RNG and 12,200 kg per day of green hydrogen. But due to incentives for green hydrogen in the Inflation Reduction Act, the company has pivoted to a hydrogen-only design, Hobby said.

The $3/kg incentive for green hydrogen in the IRA created “additional value for no real capital cost differential,” he said.

Yosemite’s second project is in Toulumne County, California and will follow a design substantially similar to the Oroville facility.

The company employs dual-bed gasification technology licensed from Austrian firm Repotec, while Primoris is doing detailed design and engineering.

The technology takes wood and creates a medium-strength BTU gas that can be used to make different products, Hobby said. “Once it’s in a gaseous form, we can use it for a lot of purposes: we can take it to make power, we can produce hydrogen, we can use the Fischer-Tropsch process to make second-generation biofuels like aviation fuel, and we have a patent that can do hydrogen and RNG.”

Project ownership

Meanwhile, Yosemite has hired a Texas-based firm to help raise capital for projects, which are estimated to cost $250m at the outset, but could decline once efficiencies are achieved, Hobby said.

The company’s project ownership model is unique in that it seeks to bring in local wood businesses – in logging, land clearing, and orchard removal – as providers of biomass and also equity investors in the projects.

“To have their investment and their wood at the same time is huge,” Hobby said.

In raising capital for the projects, in addition to equity and debt investors, Yosemite is evaluating a mix of sources in the tax-exempt bond market as well as lower-interest loans from within California and export finance solutions. The company recently received two $500,000 Forest Biomass to Carbon-Negative Biofuels grants from the California Department of Conservation.

Hobby would like to build 50 woody biomass plants in California, which would utilize approximately 5 million tons of the 35 million tons of waste woody biomass available annually in the state.

“Our goal is not to have to truck and ship wood more than 50 miles,” he said. “If you put circles around every place in California that’s a decent wood basket […] I think we could sign about 50 facilities across the state.”

The company is also planning to expand beyond California to other states with a low-carbon fuel standard, Hobby said.

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It’s an electrolyzer – but for CO2

A New Jersey-based start-up is seeking to commercialize an electrocatalytic technology that transforms CO2 into a monomer for the plastics industry.

RenewCO2 is developing and seeking to commercialize a modular technology that converts waste CO2 into a usable product.

The New Jersey-based company is advancing a pilot project at an Ace Ethanol plant in Wisconsin that will take CO2 and convert it to monoethylene glycol, which can be used by the plastics industry.

The project was recently selected by the US DOE to receive a $500,000 grant. It seeks to demonstrate the technology’s ability to reduce the ethanol plant’s carbon footprint and produce a carbon-negative chemical.

In an interview, RenewCO2 co-founders Anders Laursen and Karin Calvinho said their technology, which was developed at Rutgers University, is geared toward carbon emitters who can not easily pipe away their CO2 and who may have use for the resulting product.


“It’s a matter of economics,” said Calvinho, who serves as the company’s CTO. Using the RenewCO2 technology, the ethanol plant or other user is able to keep 45Q tax incentives for capturing CO2 while also creating a product that generates an additional revenue stream.

Additionally, the modular design of the technology prevents emitters from having to build expensive pipeline infrastructure for CO2, she added. “We want to help to facilitate the use of the CO2 on site,” she said.

One of the goals of the project is to measure the carbon intensity of these technologies in combination, which ultimately depends on the electricity source for the electrochemical process, similar to an electrolyzer, Laursen, who is the CEO, said.

“The main constraint from a location point of view is the availability of reliable and affordable green power,” Laursen added.

Creating a market

The principal target market for RenewCO2’s technology is existing producers of monoethylene glycol (MEG), which is used to make recycled plastics, as well as ethanol producers and other emitters with purified CO2 streams.

Producers of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) – one of the most recycled plastics globally – are also potential customers since they use MEG in their production process and have CO2 sources on site.

“Right now, MEG produced in the US is, for the most part, not polymerized into PET – it’s shipped overseas for making PET plastics used in textiles, and then made into fibers or shipped further,” Laursen said. “So if you can shorten that transport chain, you can reduce the CO2 emissions associated with the final product.”

RenewCO2 is looking for partners to help build the modular units, and is evaluating the purchase of existing PEM electrolyzer units that can be reconfigured, or having the units custom manufactured.

“We’re talking to potential manufacturing partners and evaluating whether we should do the manufacturing ourselves,” Calvinho said. And if they choose the latter route, she added, “we will have to build our own facilities, but it’s early to say.”

The company has raised a total of $10m in venture investment and grant funding, including a pre-seed round of over $2m from Energy Transition Ventures, a Houston-based venture capital fund.

While not currently fundraising, Laursen said they are always taking calls to get to know the investors that are interested in the space. He added that the company may need to raise additional capital in 12 to 18 months.

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Methanol-to-hydrogen firm planning capital raise

An early-stage provider of distributed methanol-to-hydrogen solutions is planning a capital raise as it scales up.

Kaizen Clean Energy, a Houston-based methanol-to-hydrogen fuel company, is planning to raise additional capital in support of upcoming projects.

The company, which uses methanol and water to produce hydrogen with modular units, recently completed a funding round led by Balcor Companies, in which Balcor took a minority interest in Kaizen.

Additional funding in the capital raise was provided by friends and family, Kaizen co-founder and chief commercial officer Eric Smith said in an interview.

But with its sights on larger project opportunities this year, the company is already targeting an additional capital raise to support continued growth, Smith said. He declined to comment further on the capital raise and potential advisors, but noted that the company’s CFO, Craig Klaasmeyer, is a former Credit Suisse banker.

Kaizen’s methanol model utilizes a generator license from Element 1 and adds in systems to produce power or hydrogen, targeting the diesel generator market, EV charging and microgrids as well as hydrogen fueling and industrial uses.

Compared to trucking in hydrogen, the model using methanol, an abundant chemical, cuts costs by around 50%, Smith said, noting that Kaizen’s containers are at cost parity with diesel.

In addition, the Kaizen container is cleaner than alternatives, producing no nitric or sulfur oxide, according to Smith. Its carbon intensity score is 45, compared to 90 for the California electric grid and 100 for diesel generators.

Smith also touts a streamlined permitting process for Kaizen’s containerized product. The company recently received a letter of exemption for the container from a California air district due to low or no emissions. The product similarly does not require a California state permit and similarly, when off grid, no city permits are required, he added.

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