Resource logo with tagline

Mitsui acquires unconventional gas asset in Texas

The asset is in South Texas with access to the Gulf Coast industrial area, which includes liquefied natural gas export terminals and ammonia plants.

Mitsui & Co., through its U.S. based subsidiary, has completed the acquisition of approx. 92% working interest in an unconventional gas asset in Texas, U.S.A. from the operator, Silver Hill Eagle Ford E&P, LLC, a subsidiary of Silver Hill Energy Partners, LP.

This asset (a part of the Hawkville field, approx. gross 8,500 acre) is in South Texas with access to the Gulf Coast industrial area, which includes liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminals and ammonia plants, according to a news release. Additional gas production is expected from this asset with further development and Mitsui E&P USA LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Mitsui, will develop and operate the asset, aiming for stable gas production of over 200 million cubic feet per day from the field, while maintaining a focus on the safety of employees, the community, and the environment.

Mitsui is also promoting liquefaction and export of U.S. natural gas to global markets, and methanol production businesses using natural gas as feedstock. In addition to proactively pursuing upstream development projects, we will strengthen the natural gas value chain, including adjacent businesses, and work toward achieving further low-carbon solutions and decarbonization through the use of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) and other measures.

Mitsui believes that natural gas and LNG will play an important role as a “pragmatic solution” for energy transition, the release says.

Unlock this article

The content you are trying to view is exclusive to our subscribers.
To unlock this article:

You might also like...

German IPP secures €500m financing facility from EIG

The facility is expected to support ILOS’s plans to generate more than 2 GW of power through solar and battery projects by 2026, but also contemplates the deployment of capital to co-located battery storage and hydrogen.

ILOS Projects, a Pan-European Independent Power Producer (IPP) sponsored by Omnes, today announced the signing of a €500m structured credit facility with EIG, an institutional investor in the global energy and infrastructure sectors.

The facility is expected to support ILOS’s plans to generate more than 2 GW of power through solar and battery projects by 2026. The facility comprises an initial tranche of €250m and includes an accordion that would increase the loan amount by an additional €250m. Additional financing terms were not disclosed.

The facility is intended to accelerate ILOS’s growth toward becoming a leading Pan-European IPP, with loan proceeds available to provide construction equity and acquisition capital for ready-to-build assets. Initially, ILOS intends to focus on projects in Ireland, the UK, the Netherlands, Greece and Italy, but the facility also contemplates the deployment of capital in other OECD jurisdictions as well as in co-located battery storage and hydrogen.

Akereos Capital acted as sole bookrunner, structurer and exclusive debt advisor to ILOS. Allen & Overy served as legal advisor to ILOS and Milbank served as EIG’s legal advisor.

Rob Johnson, managing director and global head of direct lending at EIG, said, “We’re thrilled to support ILOS in these exciting growth initiatives as they work to expand their footprint across Europe. This transaction is a testament to our confidence in the management team, their strategy and ILOS’s sponsors, and it underscores EIG’s commitment to investing in high-quality assets and energy infrastructure that support a low-carbon future.”

Michael Pollan, partner at Omnes, said, “ILOS has seen tremendous growth over the last two years. We are proud to continue supporting the company as it works toward this ambitious IPP project. We also look forward to partnering with EIG, a leader in the energy infrastructure sector that shares our common values and strategic view.”

Read More »

Strata Clean Energy acquires green H2 potential

The acquisition of Crossover Energy Partners offers Strata proficiencies in the development of technologies like green hydrogen.

Strata Clean Energy, the North Carolina-based clean energy generation and storage developer, has acquired Phoenix-based Crossover Energy Partners, according to a press release.

Crossover offers Strata customer origination and power offtake competencies and proficiencies in the development of new technologies like green hydrogen. The company develops end-to-end energy transition products for utilities and large energy users.

The combining of these platforms grows Strata’s development pipeline to more than 15 GW.

Strata is purchasing 100% of Crossover’s assets and interest in its development platform. CEO Sabino Dias and President Michael Grunow will take on senior roles within Strata, and all Crossover employees will merge with the Strata platform.

Read More »

NET Power and Rice Acquisition garner additional $275m PIPE commitments

The original transaction in December concerns NET Power’s 300 MW Serial Number 1 project near Odessa, Texas.

ET Power and Rice Acquisition Corp. II have announced an additional $275m of PIPE commitments in connection with their proposed business combination, according to a news release.

Occidental has increased its commitment to the PIPE by $250m, bringing its total investment to $350m, while the Rice family has committed an additional $25m, bringing their total investment to $125m.

“We believe NET Power’s technology can accelerate emissions reductions in our existing operations and ultimately supply emissions-free power to the Direct Air Capture facilities and sequestration hubs we are developing, the release states.”

The new commitments bring the expected gross proceeds of the business combination to $845m for NET Power, consisting of approximately $345m from RONI’s trust account (assuming no redemptions), and approximately $500m from the PIPE raised entirely at $10 per share of common stock.

Assuming no RONI shareholders exercise their redemption rights, the combined company is expected to have a market capitalization in excess of $2bn.

“Since announcing the transaction in December 2022, NET Power has continued to make excellent progress towards commercialization of its utility-scale power plant, including FEED commencement on the Occidental-hosted Serial Number 1 (“SN1”) project near Odessa, Texas,” the release states. “In support of the plant, NET Power expects Occidental will be a key offtaker of the clean power generated by SN1.”

It is anticipated that Occidental will manage the transportation, storage, and utilization of the captured CO2 from SN1.

“We believe NET Power’s technology can accelerate emissions reductions in our existing operations and ultimately supply emissions-free power to the Direct Air Capture facilities and sequestration hubs we are developing,” Vicki Hollub, president and CEO of Occidental, said in the release.

Following this additional commitment, Occidental’s ownership stake in the combined company will increase to approximately 39%, assuming no redemptions.

NET Power expects $200m of net proceeds from the business combination and the PIPE to fully fund corporate operations through commercialization of SN1, which is expected to be operational in 2026.

The net proceeds above $200m are expected to support SN1 capital needs and future commercial origination efforts.

Read More »

EXCLUSIVE: 8 Rivers co-founder departs firm

A co-founder and executive has departed the North Carolina-based firm, which recently announced an ammonia project in Texas.

Bill Brown, a co-founder of the technology commercialization firm and clean fuels developer 8 Rivers Capital, has retired from the company, a spokesperson confirmed via email.
According to Brown’s LinkedIn profile, he is serving now as CEO of New Waters Capital. He co-founded 8 Rivers and also served as CEO and CTO in this nearly 16 years there.
Brown did not respond to a request for comment.
According to 8 Rivers’ website, Dharmesh Patel is serving as interim CEO. The company recently announced development of the Cormorant Clean Energy ammonia production facility in Port Arthur, Texas
Read More »
exclusive

Carbon credit project developer planning equity raise

A Texas-based carbon credit firm is preparing to sell credits from its first project in the US southeast and planning its first equity raise in 2024.

Sky Harvest Carbon, the Dallas-based carbon credit project developer, is preparing to sell credits from its first project, roughly 30,000 acres of forest in the southeastern US, while looking toward its first equity raise in 2024, CEO and founder Will Clayton said in an interview.

In late 2024 the company will seek to raise between $5m and $10m in topco equity, depending on the outcome of grant applications, Clayton said. The company is represented by Scott Douglass & McConnico in Austin, Texas and does not have a relationship with a financial advisor.

Sky Harvest considers itself a project developer, using existing liquidity to pay landowners on the backend for timber rights, then selling credits based on the volume and age of the trees for $20 to $50 per credit (standardized as 1 mtpy of carbon).

The company will sell some 45,000 credits from its pilot project — comprised of acreage across Virginia, North Carolina, Louisiana and Mississippi – in 2024, Clayton said. The project involves 20 landowners.

Clayton, formerly chief of staff at North Carolina-based renewables and P2X developer Strata Clean Energy, owns a controlling stake in Sky Harvest Carbon. He said he’s self-funded operations to date, in part with private debt. The company is also applying for a multi-million-dollar grant based on working with small and underrepresented landowners.

“There’s a wall of demand… that’s coming against a supply constraint,” Clayton said of companies wanting to buy credits to meet carbon reduction goals.

Sky Harvest would be interested in working with companies wanting to secure supply or credits before price spikes, or investors wanting to acquire the credits as an asset prior to price spikes, Clayton said.

“Anybody who wants to go long on carbon, either as an investment thesis or for the climate benefits to offset operational footprint, it’s a great way to do it by locking supply at a low cost,” he said.

A novel approach to credit definition

Carbon credits on the open market vary widely in verifications standards and price; they can cost anywhere from $1 to $2,000.

“There’s a long process for all the measurements and verifications,” Clayton said.

There are many forestry carbon developers paying landowners for environmental benefits and selling those credits. Where Sky Harvest is unique is its attempt to redefine the carbon credit, Clayton said.

The typical definition of 1 mtpy of CO2 is problematic, as it does not gauge for duration of storage, he said. Carbon emitted into the atmosphere can stay there indefinitely.

“If you’re storing carbon for 10, 20, 30 years, the scales don’t balance,” Clayton said. “That equation breaks and it’s not truly an offset.”

Sky Harvest is quantifying the value of carbon over time by equating volume with duration, Clayton said.

“If you have one ton of carbon dioxide going into the atmosphere forever on one side of the scale, you need multiple tons of carbon dioxide stored on the other side of the scale if it’s for any time period other than forever,” he said, noting that credit providers often cannot guarantee that the protected trees will never be harvested. Sky Harvest inputs more than 1 ton per credit, measured in periods of five years guaranteed storage at a time. “We compensate for the fact that it’s not going to be stored there forever.”

Monitoring protected land is expensive and often difficult to sustain. Carbon markets work much like conservation easements, but those easements often lose effect over time as oversight diminishes (typically because of staffing or funding shortages at the often nonprofit groups charged with monitoring).

“That doesn’t work in any other industry with real physical commodities,” Clayton said. “The way every other industry works is you pay a fund delivery. That’s our measure-as-you-go approach.”

A similar methodology has been put forward by the United Nations and has been adopted in Quebec, Clayton said.

Read More »

Exclusive: World Energy GH2 targeting early 2025 FID

World Energy GH2 is aiming to reach FID early next year – and advancing project financing discussions with a pair of advisors – on the $5bn phase 1 green ammonia development in Newfoundland and Labrador known as Project Nujio’qonik. We spoke to Managing Director and CEO Sean Leet in detail about the project.

World Energy GH2, the developer of a green ammonia export project in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is aiming to reach FID in early 2025 on phase 1 of Project Nujio’qonik, Managing Director and CEO Sean Leet said in an interview.

Phase 1 of the project entails the construction of a 1 GW wind facility and 600 MW of electrolysis for an estimated cost of $5bn, Leet said. Once complete, the first phase of Project Nujio’qonik is expected to produce approximately 400,000 tonnes of green ammonia for export.

The developer is working with Green Giraffe and RBC Capital Markets to advance a project financing deal, the same advisors that assisted World Energy GH2 on a $95m loan from Export Development Canada, announced last week.

The debt-to-equity split for the $5bn capital raise is still being iterated as the company looks at financing options with the available government subsidies and potential support from export agencies, Leet said. The company has not yet lined up an arranger for debt financing and expects to make a decision on that role at a later date, he added.

A schedule update is in progress as part of the project’s FEED readiness assessment. This update, considering factors such as long lead item availability and offtaker delivery requirements, is a required step before the start of FEED and is expected to be released around April 15. 

The FEED readiness assessment, Leet said, “is a process that we’ve undertaken with some value engineering due to some learnings from the pre-FEED deliverables and some other aspects of just making sure we’re well prepared for FEED so we can execute flawlessly on that.”

Leet expects the FEED process will take between nine and 12 months, setting the developer up for an FID in early 2025. As part of a competitive bidding process, World Energy GH2 was awarded four different Crown land sites, each capable of producing 1 GW of wind power, allowing for additional phases up to 4 GW of renewables.

Newfoundland, the distant Canadian island where Project Nujio’qonik is located, has become a hotbed of green ammonia project activity due to its exceptional wind resource, with as many eight major projects springing up (see, and zoom, on map).

Investment outlook

The Canadian government has promulgated a clean hydrogen investment tax credit of up to 40% on certain expenses, available until 2035. And in its most recent budget, the government floated the idea of providing contracts for difference to help de-risk emission-reducing projects. 

Leet believes that the CfD arrangement, which will be administered by the Canada Growth Fund, will be tied to the Canada-Germany Hydrogen Alliance, an agreement that promotes clean hydrogen trade ties between the two nations. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz signed the accord at World Energy GH2’s site in Stephenville, with the aim of shipping hydrogen or ammonia by 2025 – a timeline that looks increasingly stretched. And World Energy GH2 earlier this year became the first North American member of Germany’s Port of Wilhelmshaven's energy hub.

“Those details haven’t been announced yet but we’re hopeful that the CfD mechanism is there to work alongside the ITC,” Leet said.

Additional financing could come from more export credit agencies “in the countries you would expect” that would support local companies providing equipment to Project Nujio’qonik. “That will be a very likely piece of our financing arrangement.”

World Energy GH2 is in discussions with various offtakers, but will be able to engage in greater detail once the ITC and CfD subsidies are clarified, and once the project receives its environmental permit, Leets said. 

World Energy GH2 was set up as a standalone Canadian company with the sole purpose of executing on Project Nujio’qonik. It is owned by its founders along with SK ecoplant, the environment and energy arm of Korea’s SK Group, which took a 20% stake in the company – and also the project – for $50m.

Gene Gebolys, the founder and CEO of World Energy LLC, a provider of low-carbon fuels, is also a founder of Project Nujio’qonik. And John Risley, another partner of the Canadian project, is a co-owner of World Energy LLC.

Support from existing investors along with the Export Development Canada facility announced last week make the project entity well capitalized to move “expeditiously” through FEED to FID, Leet said.

Canada to Europe

World Energy GH2 is talking to the major ammonia players about a scale-up of import capacity on European shores.

Leet noted specifically that the Antwerp-Bruges port has plans to scale up to handle the increased amounts of ammonia imports, for use in the various industries located in Belgium and potentially on to Germany from there.

Three companies – Fluxys, Advario Stolthaven Antwerp, and Advario Gas Terminal – have said they are considering constructing an open-access ammonia import terminal at the port of Antwerp-Bruges. Air Liquide also said it will build an ammonia cracking facility there.

The Port of Wilhelmshaven, Germany, where World Energy GH2 is a member of the energy hub, has similar plans to scale up, with various companies evaluating ammonia import terminals and cracking facilities.

Meanwhile, Leet said the ammonia product that it ships to Europe, in addition to benefiting from Canadian subsidies and tax credits, will also comply with the EU’s RFNBO standards.

The project has existing grid and water connections already at the Port of Stephenville, since the hydrogen plant will be built on top of a former paper mill which consumed both water and electricity. 

“So we're fortunate to have that grid connection available to us and the power in the Newfoundland grid is well over 90% existing hydro,” Leet said. “So between that and our wind power, we will have no issue meeting the standard set by the EU for green hydrogen and it will be 100% RFNBO compliant.”

The company is working on regulatory certification with multiple bodies but has not finalized a provider.

Read More »

Welcome Back

Get Started

Sign up for a free 15-day trial and get the latest clean fuels news in your inbox.