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TES developing $4bn green hydrogen project in Quebec

Upon its commissioning in 2028, the project will produce 70,000 tonnes of green hydrogen exclusively dedicated to Québec end users.

The Canadian arm of Tree Energy Solutions is developing a $4bn green hydrogen project in Quebec, Canada.

The effort, known as Projet Mauricie, consists of the construction of an electrolyzer and renewable energy production assets, according to a news release.

Upon its commissioning in 2028, the project will produce 70,000 tonnes of green hydrogen exclusively dedicated to Québec end users.

With the aim of reducing annual CO2 emissions by 800,000 tonnes, it is amongst the largest decarbonization projects announced in Québec to date.

The majority of the project’s energy needs will be met by its own 1 GW wind and solar farm.

Considering Québec’s energy context, the project’s behind-the-meter assets will minimize the energy drawn from Hydro-Québec’s grid, while also offering optimization opportunities, including loadshedding during peak winter periods.

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Green hydrogen developer seeking platform capital

A UK-based green hydrogen developer is looking for investment partners to take a stake in its green hydrogen/ammonia platform consisting of several globally based projects.

Hive Energy is looking to raise development capital by means of a primary equity raise to support the on-going development costs for Hive’s global green hydrogen and green ammonia portfolio and supporting the advancement of its three core projects to FID.

A subsidiary of Hive Energy, Hive Hydrogen is a green hydrogen and green hydrogen-based derivatives development platform. Hive Hydrogen has a diversified global portfolio of projects supported by ~16GW of dedicated solar and wind pipelines across Europe, Africa, and LATAM to supply cost-competitive green hydrogen and ammonia to local and international markets, the company said on its website.

Its most advanced projects are in South Africa and Spain, targeting the 1st COD between 2027/2028, with another project in Chile targeting COD in 2030. Over 340,000 ha of land have been secured across these three projects for the installation of ~16GW of renewable generation assets and ~8GW hydrogen/ammonia production assets.

Hive Hydrogen’s business model provides investors with attractive development returns across a pipeline of advanced and earlier-stage projects.

Hive is seeking one or more partners to provide an investment into our green hydrogen/ammonia portfolio, taking a stake in the platform of up to 50%.

Hive Energy brings a ‘Developer DNA’ to the projects, having developed more than 2.7GW of solar PV/BESS with a further 8.5GW of green energy projects in the pipeline.

More information about Hive’s projects can be found on its website.

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Pembina and Marubeni developing Canada-to-Japan blue ammonia project

The project will be structured as an infrastructure-style, fee-based business with investment grade counterparties and is seen as an anchor to a proposed 2,000-acre clean fuels industrial complex in Alberta.

Pembina Pipeline Corporation and Marubeni Corporation have signed an MOU to develop a blue ammonia supply chain from Western Canada to Japan and other Asian markets, according to a news release.

The facility will be on Pembina-owned lands adjacent to its Redwater Complex in the Alberta Industrial Heartland near Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.

Initial feasibility studies have been completed and the facility has an anticipated design capacity of up to 185 kilotonnes per year of hydrogen production, which will be converted into approximately one million tonnes per year of ammonia.

The facility will include carbon capture with the potential for integrated transportation and sequestration on the proposed Alberta Carbon Grid being developed by Pembina and TC Energy.

The ammonia would be transported via rail to Canada’s WestCoast and shipped to Japan and other Asian markets.

Under the MOA, Pembina and Marubeni will focus on the preliminary Front End Engineering Design (pre-FEED), engagement with various stakeholders, including governments in Canada and Japan, and commercial activities.

The project is expected to be structured as an infrastructure-style, fee-based business with investment grade counter parties. Pre-FEED work is currently expected to be completed by early 2024.

The project could potentially serve as an anchor development to advance Pembina’s ongoing efforts to establish a new growth platform known as the Pembina Low Carbon Complex (PLCC) for energy transition technologies, sustainable fuels, and chemicals like hydrogen, ammonia and methanol.

“With over 2,000 contiguous acres of undeveloped land located in the Alberta Industrial Heartland, Pembina’s vision is to develop an industrial complex for low-carbon energy infrastructure to better enable Pembina and third parties to develop projects, while reducing costs, emissions, and risk,” the release states.

Projects within the PLCC would gain access to land, low-carbon hydrogen, clean power, natural gas and industrial gases, water, CCUS, and the construction and operation of rail assets. Within the PLCC, Pembina would lease land to third parties and provide infrastructure, logistics, and shared services to tenants.

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US SAF producer targeting 1H24 monetization

Calumet Specialty Products subsidiary Montana Renewables – now the largest producer of sustainable aviation fuel in North America – has received interest for the business indicating valuations in excess of the entire company’s current enterprise value.

Calumet Specialty Products is expecting to close on a monetization of a minority equity stake by early 2024 in its Montana Renewables subsidiary, which is now the largest sustainable aviation fuel producer in North America.

The company has been exploring a monetization, including an IPO, of Montana Renewables with Lazard as an advisor since last year, and would use proceeds to deleverage the parent company. Executives said today they are speaking with bulge bracket banks regarding the timing of a potential IPO or minority stake sale.

“We continue to expect a potential monetization of Montana Renewables to complete the deleveraging of Calumet,” CEO Todd Borgman said in prepared remarks. “For some time we’ve discussed the possibility of a Montana Renewables IPO, private monetization, or even both. We continue to receive clear feedback: that Montana Renewables is a differentiated business, with transformational value potential to Calumet, well in excess of the entire company’s enterprise value.”

Calumet had engaged Lazard last year to conduct a process that culminated in a $250m investment in Montana Renewables from Warburg Pincus in August, 2022. The investment, in the form of a participating preferred equity security, valued Montana Renewables at a pre-commissioning enterprise value of $2.25bn.

The facility began making SAF shipments to Shell as an offtaker earlier this year.

In response to a question, Calumet executives pointed to the enterprise values of publicly traded energy transition companies, noting that Montana Renewables should align with that “at a minimum, if not get a premium for the competitive advantages that we’ve got, due to location, due to advanced pre-treater technology we’ve got, and due to the fact that we’re now North America’s largest SAF producer.”

Calumet’s equity trades at $15.80 per share and a $1.26bn market cap.

The company is evaluating an expansion of its SAF production at Montana Renewables and has purchased a second reactor and applied for a $600m loan from the DOE.

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Exclusive: Pan-Atlantic developer planning e-methanol project in West Texas

A clean fuels developer with projects on both sides of the Atlantic is pursuing an e-methanol project in West Texas with an estimated cost of between $800m – $900m.

Green fuels developer ETFuels is planning an e-methanol project in West Texas.

Following the blueprint of projects in development in Finland and Spain, ETFuels has leased land and the Lone Star State is in the early stages of determining the feasibility of the project, which would require between 300 MW – 500 MW of renewables, Director Patrick Woodson said.

Depending on the ultimate size of the project, it would cost between $800m – $900m and produce 80,000 to 120,000 tons per year of e-methanol on site, he said, which would then be trucked to end markets.

“We like the modularity of projects of that size,” he said, noting “more optionality to bring projects to market.”

Woodson, the former CEO and Chairman of E.ON Climate & Renewables, a renewables developer, said ETFuels would develop the renewables portion of the project internally.

The company is still exploring likely target markets for the e-fuels, but Woodson noted that they perceive robust demand for green methanol from the shipping industry.

“We understand the decarbonization challenges faced by the shipping industry are significant, with question marks over pricing and supply availability at scale, and we are addressing these head-on,” ETFuels CEO Lara Naqushbandi said in a news release last year.

ETFuels attracted financial backing last year from France-based SWEN Capital Partners, with Green Giraffe providing financial advisory services.

For its Spain project, the company is developing a 100,000 ton green methanol plant, including 420 MW of solar PV and 120 MW of onshore wind capacity powering 220 MW of electrolyzers.

It expects to take a final investment decision on the Spain project by 2025, with production anticipated for 2028, according to the company website.

ETFuels as a third project in development in Finland, powered by “relentless” Arctic winds.

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California biomass-to-hydrogen firm in Series A

A woody biomass-to-hydrogen firm in California is conducting an in-house Series A for engineering and design on its first project, one that will need more than $800m of debt and equity in the future.

Mote Inc. is aiming to finish a Series A round, raising between $12m and $15m, by the end of the year, CEO Joshuah Stolaroff said in an interview.

The company does not have a relationship with a financial advisor and has been conducting the raise in-house, he said. Moving forward the company will need a financial advisor.

The Series A will provide some 18 months of technology development runway, plus engineering and design on the first project in Bakersfield, Kern County. That will require some $800m in debt and project equity to start in the next year.

A second project in Sacramento is in the pre-Feed stage. That development is the subject of a recently secured grant from the Sacramento Municipal Utility District.

“We need big partners to do it on any meaningful scale,” Stolaroff said of biomass-to-hydrogen. Investors tend to be technology VCs with little or no knowledge of project finance, and infra funds looking for no-risk projects. “We fall somewhere in between.”

Part of the Arches H2 hub in California, Mote has ambitions to expand to other areas of the US with good biomass supply and CO2 storage, like the southeast and Gulf Coast, Stolaroff said. The company would also like to expand internationally.

“We are a great deal right now,” he said of the Series A,” adding that a Series B or project equity round will follow shortly.

Majority equity is held by the company’s six employees, Stolaroff said. There are also seed investors that hold equity.

Abundant feedstock and a growing offtake market

Mote’s three primary feedstocks are agricultural and forestry reside and urban green waste. California produces some 45m tons of it per year and the number nationwide is about half-a-billion, Stolaroff said.

Mote is confident for demand from hydrogen customers, Stoaroff said. Transportation is expected to be a strong demand source by the time Mote is operational. The Arches hub also has connections with municipal users, filling stations and the ports of LA and Long Beach.

“We are all planning for growth,” he said.

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Exclusive: Green hydrogen developer planning capital raises for distributed portfolio

A developer of US green hydrogen projects will need to access the project equity, debt and tax equity markets in the near term for a pipeline of distributed assets nationwide.

NovoHydrogen, the Colorado-based renewable hydrogen developer, will be in the market for project financing for a portfolio of distributed green hydrogen projects in 2024, CEO Matt McMonagle said.

The company, which recently agreed to a $20m capital raise with Modern Energy, is aiming to attract additional private equity and infrastructure investors for the projects it is developing, the executive said.

“The opportunity is really there for attractive risk-adjusted returns at the project level based on how we’re structuring these projects with long-term contracted revenue,” he said.

The company plans to bring its first projects online in late 2024 or 2025.

“We don’t have the project financing set at the point that we can announce, but that’s something myself and my team have done in our careers,” McMonagle said, adding that he’s focused on bankability since founding the company. “We wanted to be as easy for the lenders to underwrite as possible.”

No financial advisors have been attached to the project financings, McMonagle said. A recently announced Series A, first reported by ReSource in February, gave the company exposure to investors that want to participate in project financings, he said.

“We’ll really be ramping that process up, likely after the new year,” McMonagle added, declining to say how much the company would need to raise in 2024.

NovoHydrogen doesn’t have a timeline on a Series B, he said.

Distributed pipeline

The company looks to do onsite projects adjacent to consumption, McMonagle said. The first projects that will go online will be 10 MW and smaller.

“Typically the permitting is straightforward in that we’re adding equipment to an already impacted industrial site,” McMonagle said. He declined to elaborate on where these projects are located or what customers they will serve.

The company also has off-site, or near-site projects, where production is decoupled from consumption. But the company still calls those distributed because they are being developed with a targeted customer in mind.

“We want to be as close as possible to that customer,” he said. Those off-site projects typically are larger and will begin coming online in 2026 and 2027.  

In Texas NovoHydrogen has two large-scale green hydrogen developments in production, co-located with greenfield renewables projects, McMonagle said. Partners, including EPC, are in place for those efforts. The company also has projects in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and along the west coast.

“Where can we add the most value and have the biggest competitive advantage?” McMonagle said of the company’s geographic strategy. “We have very specific go-to-markets in each of those regions which we feel play to our strengths.”

NovoHydrogen is a member of the Pacific Northwest Hydrogen Hub and is involved with the Appalachian Regional Clean Hydrogen Hub (ARCH2), though not in line to receive DOE funding through that hub.

Post-IRA, green hydrogen projects will look much like renewables deals from the equity, tax equity and debt perspectives, he said.

“We’re structuring and setting up our projects to take advantage of that existing infrastructure and knowledge base of how to finance deals,” he said. New options on transferability will enable additional financing options as well.

No flipping

NovoHydrogen does not plan to flip projects before COD, McMonagle said.

“We are planning to deploy hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars in capex for these projects, and we’ll certainly need to partner with folks to deploy that capital,” McMonagle said. “But we will remain in deals with our customers because that relationship is really the fundamental value that we bring in our business.”

Hydrogen projects are different from renewables in that the customers need greater assurances of resiliency, security of supply and performance, than in a space like solar, he said.

Flipping projects before COD would be inconsistent with the trust required to attract offtakers.

“We don’t believe doing a flip reflects that level of importance and support and, frankly, incentive, behavioral incentive, that we have to show to our customers,” he said.

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