Resource logo with tagline

Alberta natural gas pipeline network in development

The CAD $2bn project consists of building approximately 200 kilometers of high-pressure natural gas pipeline and related control and compression facilities that will run from Peers, Alberta, to the northeast Edmonton area.  

Canadian Utilities Limited is developing an energy infrastructure project to expand capacity and enhance efficiency of Alberta’s natural gas network and drive lower-carbon economic growth in the province, according to a news release

The Yellowhead Mainline project will connect natural gas producers to key markets. The project is expected to provide gas supply for the more than $20 billion of investment and associated employment in Alberta for customers including the Dow Fort Saskatchewan Path2Zero project.

The project consists of building approximately 200 kilometers of high-pressure natural gas pipeline and related control and compression facilities that will run from Peers, Alberta, to the northeast Edmonton area.

Total investment for the project is expected to exceed $2bn. The expansion is expected to have the capability to deliver about 1,000 terajoules (or 1 billion cubic feet) per day of incremental natural gas delivery capacity and is planned to be on-stream in 4Q27 with construction expected to commence in 2026.

ATCO Energy Systems made capital expenditures of $1,213m ($1,130m excluding International Natural Gas Distribution) and capital investments of $1,219m ($1,136m excluding International Natural Gas Distribution) in 2023.

ATCO Energy Systems expects its capital investment to be in the range of $4.3bn to $4.7bn from 2024 to 2026.

Unlock this article

The content you are trying to view is exclusive to our subscribers.
To unlock this article:

You might also like...

EnCap and Mercuria invest in Arbor Renewable Gas

The Houston-based renewable gas developer has also entered into development and licensing agreements with SunGas Renewables and Haldor Topsoe, respectively.

Arbor Renewable Gas, the Houston, Texas-based sustainable gas developer, has taken an underlying capital commitment from EnCap Investments L.P. and Mercuria Energy Company, according to a news release.

SunGas Renewables, a subsidiary of GTI International, has entered into an exclusive Joint Development Agreement with Arbor Gas to provide its gasification systems to Arbor Gas projects and Haldor Topsoe has licensed its process and technology for methanol and gasoline synthesis.

Arbor Gas is developing industrial scale renewable gasoline and green hydrogen projects in the US. The strategy is to design, build, own, and operate facilities that efficiently convert woody biomass into renewable gasoline and green hydrogen.

Arbor Gas is led by Co-Founders, Chief Executive Officer Timothy E. Vail and John G. Kennedy III.

Read More »

Fluor and Carbfix collaborating on CCS solutions

The companies look to partner with clients looking for end-to-end CO2 reduction. An MOU enables the two companies to pursue CO2 removal projects like direct air capture and bioenergy CCS.

Fluor Corporation has signed an MOU with Carbfix, the CO2 mineral storage operator, to pursue CCS solutions, according to a news release.

Together the companies look to decarbonize hard-to-abate industries like steel, aluminum and cement.

“The companies will leverage their respective expertise to partner with clients looking for end-to-end CO2 reduction,” the release states. “The MOU also enables the two companies to pursue CO2 removal projects such as direct air capture and bioenergy carbon capture and storage.”

Fluor will provide its proprietary carbon capture technology and EPC. Carbfix’ technology dissolves CO2 in water and injects it into porous basaltic rock formations, where natural processes cause the CO2 to form stable carbonate minerals within two years.

Carbfix has applied its method of turning CO2 into stone underground for more than a decade in Iceland. The company currently captures and mineralizes one-third of the CO2 emissions from Iceland’s largest geothermal power plant, with the goal of increasing this rate to 95% by 2025.

Read More »

Mote receives $1.2m for second biomass-to-H2 plant

Construction on a project in Bakersfield, California is expected to begin in 2025 and target full operational capacity by 2027.

Mote Inc. has received $1.2m in grant funding to establish its second biomass to hydrogen and carbon sequestration plant in partnership with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, according to a news release.

As Mote’s hydrogen offtake partner for the second facility in Sacramento, SMUD and Mote have been collaborating on the project development. Upon completion, the facility would produce approximately 21,000 metric tons per year (MTPY) of carbon-negative hydrogen for use in thermal power generation and transportation.

The money comes from the US Forest Service, the California Department of Conservation, and the California Department of Forestry.

“Similar to its first project near Bakersfield, this second plant will integrate with carbon capture and geological sequestration methods to produce carbon-negative hydrogen,” the release states. “Mote can process woody waste from farms, forestry, and urban sources. The remaining carbon dioxide from the process is captured and permanently placed underground in saline aquifers for ecologically safe storage.”

Mote has received a formal invitation to submit a Part II application to the Department of Energy Loan Programs Office Title 17 Clean Energy Financing program, which can offer loan guarantees up to 80 percent of eligible project costs.

Bakersfield construction is expected to begin in 2025 and target full operational capacity by 2027.

Mote is a member of the ARCHES community and their application for the DOE’s Regional Clean Hydrogen Hub grant.

Read More »

Exclusive: Plug Power enlists bank to evaluate financing options

The cash-burning company is working with a bulge-bracket American bank to evaluate debt financing options to help stave off a liquidity crisis.

Plug Power is working with Goldman Sachs to evaluate a capital raise in the form of debt financing to shore up its balance sheet, sources said.

The New York-based company recently said it was at risk of a liquidity crisis in the next 12 months if it is not able to raise additional capital, noting it was exploring various options for bringing in financing.

Its total cash and cash equivalents as of September 30 stood at $567m, representing a decline of $580m for the quarter, according to SEC filings. The company also has nearly $1bn of restricted cash balances stemming from sale-leaseback transactions, of which $50m becomes available per quarter.

In a shareholder letter and on its 3Q23 earnings call, executives outlined the financing options that are on the table for the company, including a debt raise, funding from the Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office, and bringing in project equity partners for its facilities.

The company is “evaluating varied debt financing solutions to support [its] growth,” according to the shareholder letter. CFO Paul Middleton added on the call that they’ve had “some expressions of offers for ABL-like facilities” as well as restricted cash advance facilities. 

CEO Andy Marsh said the company would need to raise between $500m – $600m, according to a news report from Barron’s.

Representatives of Plug Power and Goldman Sachs declined to comment.

Plug is also working towards a conditional commitment from the DOE Loan Program Office to finance plants in its green hydrogen network. 

“The framework that we’re working on with them is a $1.5bn platform that would fund our green plants and would fund from construction phase onwards,” CFO Middleton said, adding that the funding could amount to as much as 80% of the projects. 

Middleton said he expected the DOE loan, if granted, would start funding in early 2Q24, and could even be used to back lever some of its existing plants in Texas and New York.

The company’s stock traded today with a $2.34bn market cap, while its outstanding debt consists of a $200m convertible note issued in 2020.

The notes traded around 130 cents of par before Plug’s going concern announcement, and subsequently dropped to trade in the high-70s, with quotes this week in the 80s.

Read More »

Exclusive: Waste-to-fuels developer preparing capital raise

A waste-to-fuels developer has lined up an advisor and is planning a capital raise for a project in West Texas, in what is expected to be the first of up to 20 similar fundraising efforts totaling $500m in external capital needs.

Recover, Inc., a Calgary-based waste-to-fuels project developer, is preparing to launch a capital raise for its first US-based projects in West Texas.

The company has lined up CIBC to assist with the capital raise while a large Canadian Crown Corporation is expected to sign on as a lending partner for the debt portion of the cap stack, CFO Shane Kozak said in an interview.

Kozak said he will need to raise $70m – $75m for the West Texas project, which will process waste from oil and gas drilling fluids and recover 800 barrels per day of low carbon intensity diesel fuel from 800 tons of waste.

Existing equity backers Azimuth Capital and BDC will participate in the capital raise, but the company is seeking additional project equity investors to take part in a 60% debt to 40% equity capital structure, Kozak said.

While the cost of the West Texas project is estimated at $55m, the company needs to raise approximately $70m to account for debt servicing and underwriting fees, he added.

Recover has mapped out a strategy to build 20 projects in oil and gas basins across the US, and estimates it will need to raise $500m in external capital over 10 years to fully develop those projects.

Project model

The company already operates a similar facility in Alberta that became operational in 2018, at a cost of CAD 20m and producing about half of what the West Texas project will produce.

“This has been commercially proven in Canada, and we’re going to a better market with a lot more drilling waste production” in the US, Kozak said.

The waste stream from oil and gas drilling contains large amounts of diesel fuel: a typical well will create 400 – 500 tons of waste, 30%-40% of which is recoverable low carbon intensity diesel, Kozak said.

In Texas, the drilling fluid waste often ends up in pits near drilling rigs or in industrial landfills, where it biodegrades over time and emits CO2 and methane into the atmosphere.

“We significantly reduce GHG emissions and create a fuel source that can be reused, and every barrel that we recover is a barrel of fuel that would otherwise have to come from a fossil fuel source,” he said.

Recent changes to Texas policy regarding oil and gas drilling waste could increase the availability of feedstock for the company. The Texas RailRoad Commission, which oversees the state’s oil and gas industry, is seeking to modernize disposal practices that would redirect waste from drilling pits to more centralized industrial landfills.

“The good thing for us is that, in the Permian Basin, about 70% – 80% of the wells use these pits, and our strategy is to build our facility directly on industrial landfills,” Kozak said.

Recover is working with a large landfill management company with operations across the US to develop its facilities, he added. The company does not pay for feedstock, given the synergistic relationship between Recover and the landfill management company.

Read More »
exclusive

Green hydrogen developer raising capital for projects

Fusion Fuel, a green hydrogen developer based in Portugal, has engaged an advisor and is in talks with investors to raise capital for projects in North America.

Fusion Fuel, a green hydrogen developer based in Portugal, has engaged an advisor and is in talks with investors to raise capital for projects in North America.

The company is working with RBC Capital Markets as financial advisor, Fusion Fuel Co-Head Zachary Steele said in an interview, and expects to produce infrastructure-type returns on its projects.

For its first project in the U.S., Fusion Fuel has agreed to a JV with Electus Energy to build a 75 MW solar-to-hydrogen facility in Bakersfield, California.

The project will produce up to 9,300 tons of green hydrogen per annum including nighttime operation and require an estimated $180m in capital investment, with a final investment decision expected in early 2024 and commissioning in the first half of 2025.

The combination of green hydrogen and solar production incentives along with California’s low carbon fuel standard make the economics of the project attractive, Steele said.

“Hydrogen is selling for up to $15-$18 per kilogram in California in the mobility market, and we can produce it at around the low $3 per kilogram area, so that leaves a lot of room for us to make a return and reduce costs for customers,” he said.

The company sells electrolyzer technology for projects but also serves as a turnkey developer. The technology consists of Hevo-Solar, which utilizes concentrated solar power to create hydrogen; and Hevo-Chain, a centralized PEM electrolyzer powered by external electricity.

Fusion Fuel’s proposition is that its smaller-scale technology – of 25 kW per unit –  is ready to use now, and can be dropped into places like a gas station in New York City, Steele said.

“This allows customers to scale into hydrogen and makes it available on site, compared with the massive projects going up in Eastern Canada or the Gulf Coast that require customers to commit significant capital to underwrite large scale projects,” he added.

Along with Electus, Fusion Fuel has already entered into a land-lease agreement for 320 acres in Kern County, California for the Bakersfield development. Black & Veatch will perform a concept study while Cornerstone Engineering and Headwaters Solutions are also engaged.

Iberian pipeline

The company targets to have EUR 40m of revenues in 2023, with a third of that coming from tech sales and the balance coming from Fusion Fuel-owned development projects.

Its revenue pipeline for next year is focused on the Iberian peninsula, and has been largely de-risked with the company having secured grants, with land and permitting underway.

In addition to the electrolyzer sales, the company, together with its partners, can provide turnkey projects that include engineering, procurement of the balance of plant equipment, construction of the facility, and operations, Steele said on an investor call this week.

“This allows us to not only make returns on the tech sale but also on the overall project and potentially recurring revenue from operations,” he said.

The company plans to use projects it is building in Portugal to expand into other core markets, beginning with a focus on mobility opportunities and targeted industrial decarbonization projects. Starting in 2024 the company plans to extend its reach further into North America and also Italy.

U.S. focus

Similar to other international hydrogen players, the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act caused a strategic shift of focus to the U.S. and accelerated Fusion Fuel’s plans to grow its business there, company executives said.

Notably, since Fusion Fuel will use its own technology in the projects it is seeking to develop, a required amount of that technology will need to be manufactured in the U.S. in order to qualify for the full benefits provided in the IRA.

As such, Fusion Fuel is scouting for a location to build one, or possibly two, manufacturing facilities in the U.S.

“The size of the Bakersfield project alone justifies building a new manufacturing facility,” Steele said on the investor call.

Steele was previously CEO of Cedar LNG, a floating LNG development in British Columbia, prior to exiting to Pembina. He works alongside Fusion Fuels Co-Head & CFO, Frederico Figueira de Chaves, who is based in Portugal.

Read More »

Welcome Back

Get Started

Sign up for a free 15-day trial and get the latest clean fuels news in your inbox.