Resource logo with tagline

bp evaluating new German hydrogen hub

The project, which would be located in Wilhelmshaven, is expected to include an industry leading ammonia cracker which could provide up to 130,000 tons of low-carbon hydrogen from green ammonia, per year, from 2028.

bp will evaluate the feasibility of building a new hydrogen hub in Germany.

The project, which would be located in Wilhelmshaven, is expected to include an industry leading ammonia cracker which could provide up to 130,000 tons of low-carbon hydrogen from green ammonia, per year, from 2028, according to a news release.

Green ammonia – produced by combining nitrogen with hydrogen derived from the electrolysis of water using renewable energy sources – is expected to be shipped from bp green hydrogen projects around the world to Wilhelmshaven. The cracker converts the green ammonia into green hydrogen by splitting the larger molecule into its smaller nitrogen and hydrogen components which can then be used directly. It’s anticipated that up to 130,000 tons of hydrogen per year could be produced from the site, with scope for further expansion as the market for future fuels develops.

Patrick Wendeler, chief executive of bp Europa SE, said: “At bp we have the expertise and capacity to cover the entire value chain of green hydrogen production, including conversion into derivates like ammonia, transport, and then reconversion to supply green hydrogen to the customers and places who need it. This development would help create greater energy independence for our German customers across a range of low carbon energy products.  Wilhelmshaven has a proud energy history, and we hope this hydrogen hub can help carve out its next chapter and help Germany meet its energy transition goals.”

bp’s plans include utilising the existing infrastructure of the Nord-West Oelleitung (NWO) terminal at Wilhelmshaven, where it is a participating shareholder. With its deep-water harbour and pipeline system, Wilhelmshaven is one of the country’s most important energy terminals and is well positioned to support energy transition activities.

Additionally, bp’s plans propose to utilize the current oil & gas pipelines for use in hydrogen transport. The low-carbon hydrogen could then be delivered to customers in the Ruhr region and other centers of demand.

Felipe Arbelaez, senior vice president hydrogen and CCS at bp, said: “The development of this import facility complements bp’s global hydrogen project portfolio, as we develop a presence in a number of potential hydrogen and ammonia export locations in the Middle East, Africa and Australia, which could supply part of the European demand in the coming years. This is another critical step in developing and delivering low carbon hydrogen in communities throughout the world.”

Unlock this article

The content you are trying to view is exclusive to our subscribers.
To unlock this article:

You might also like...

Biofuels developer seeking to raise $3.5bn for US refinery projects

A biofuels developer has engaged an international bank and is nearing FID on its first project, which produces bio-based ethylene for the plastics industry. It is seeking $3.5bn for four additional refineries.

New Energy Blue, the clean-energy developer of lowest-carbon biofuel and biochemicals from crop residues, today advances its Decarbonizing America agenda by forming New Energy Chemicals.

In phase one, the new biochemical subsidiary will produce American-sourced and American-made bio-based ethylene to enable Dow’s production of low carbon plastics used in everyday life; in phase two, it will expand operations at its Port Lavaca, Texas, facility to produce sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), according to a news release.

“New Energy Chemicals opens multiple pathways to our exponential growth in biobased fuels and chemicals,” says Albury Fleitas, President of New Energy Blue. “We’re particularly excited by our new end-to-end alternative to Brazilian ethanol for making SAF, which will begin in the American Midwest by refining agricultural waste.”

“Flexibility is baked into the process design and business operations of our biomass refineries,” adds CEO Thomas Corle. “We’re not locked into a single product, single market, or single feedstock. New Energy Chemicals gives us 360-degree downstream options for achieving liftoff of an American bioenergy revolution. We can pivot to mitigate market risk, seize growth opportunity, and hit lowest-carbon targets consistently.”

In late 2025, the New Energy Freedom biomass refinery in Mason City, Iowa, will begin converting local corn stalks into 16-20 million gallons a year of highly decarbonized (HD) cellulosic ethanol and 120,000 tons of clean HD lignin. Lignin has high value as a fossil substitute in markets like paving American roads and decarbonizing steel production.

Some of Freedom’s ethanol is destined for California and Oregon auto fuel markets; by meeting their strict low-carbon standards, it will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by over 100% per gallon of gasoline displaced. Millions of HD gallons will also head to Texas, where New Energy Chemicals will convert it into bio-based ethylene, transported via pipeline to Dow’s U.S. Gulf Coast operations for production of renewable plastics across fast-growing end markets.

Dow’s use of bio-based feedstocks from New Energy Blue is expected to be certified by ISCC Plus, an international sustainability certification program with a focus on traceability of raw materials within the supply chain. While Dow intends to mix agriculture-based ethylene into its existing manufacturing process, ISCC Plus’s chain of custody certification would allow Dow’s customers to account for bio-based materials in their supply chains.

Albury Fleitas reports that “strategic and institutional investors are actively involved in our Freedom and Chemicals projects and upcoming expansions. With engineering design completed and major permits secured, we’ve reached the final investment decision (FID) stage. By partnering with an international bank and securing USDA loan guarantees for both project sites, we anticipate ground-breaking this year.”

New Energy Blue has ambitious plans to expand its biomass refineries across America’s 140-million-acre corn belt and wheat basin, harvesting excess straws and stalks to produce billions of gallons of highly decarbonized ethanol. Shorter-term, a six-year strategy calls for attracting $3.5 billion from capital markets to build four new refineries at twice the size of Freedom and provide abundant feedstock to New Energy Chemicals. Taken together, the five refineries are designed to keep over 1,000,000 tons of CO2 out of the atmosphere annually.

Beyond meeting its growing commitments to Dow, New Energy Chemicals’ phase-two expansion can capitalize on both domestic and international demand for SAF since the Port Lavaca site has barge access to deep water shipping.

Substantial European demand by 2030 is expected from the ReFuelEU Aviation initiative, which aims to mandate a SAF blending requirement at EU airports. In addition to ramping up its biomass refinery build-out, New Energy Blue plans to license its platform globally to accelerate the production of low-carbon, plant-based feedstock for HD auto fuel, SAF, and other biochemicals.

According to the U.S. Sustainable Aviation Fuel Grand Challenge, the American SAF goal is 3 billion gallons a year by 2030, 35 billion gallons by 2050. “U.S. carbon-reducing incentives have ignited a $400 billion SAF market,” Fleitas notes. Lifecycle analysis of the company’s refinery project consistently exceeds the required 50% reduction in GHG emissions compared to ethanol made from corn grain or sugar cane. New Energy Chemicals is expected to pre-qualify for maximum decarbonizing credits, giving it an advantage in a competitive capital marketplace.

The HD ethanol-to-ethylene process employed by New Energy Chemicals is most likely compatible with conventional jet fuel methods of production, using a technology pathway similar to Brazilian ethanol-to-SAF conversion.

“Except there’s a significant gap in decarbonization scores,” says Kelly Davis, Vice President, “and that gives our future SAF a dramatic edge in getting the airlines closer to their net-zero goal for GHG emissions. It’s an extra advantage that comes from using American-sourced leftovers from the annual grain harvest.”

Because of process design flexibility, New Energy Blue biomass refineries can also convert wheat, barley, and rye straws. In arid regions where food crops can no longer grow, the company intends to restore American grasslands by planting and harvesting perennials like arundo donax and miscanthus.

“Decarbonizing America is a big ask for a big task,” Corle says. “Those 140 million acres of U.S. grain provide enough stalks and straws and grasses to feed 500 refineries and produce 20 billion gallons of exceptionally low-carbon ethanol annually. That’s how you decarbonize SAF and Dow’s renewable plastic materials, how you make a dent in replacing oil refining with biomass refining.

“It starts with a biomass refinery in Mason City, Iowa and New Energy Chemicals conversion operations in Port Lavaca, Texas. But we’re already forging partnerships with governments, customers, and developers across CanadaEuropeAsia, and Africa. Inviting them to work collaboratively towards sustainable decarbonization with global impact.”

Read More »

Enbridge enters JV for Permian to Gulf Coast pipeline

The JV with Whitewater/I Squared Capital and MPLX will develop, construct, and operate natural gas pipeline and storage assets connecting the Permian Basin natural to growing LNG and U.S. Gulf Coast demand.

Enbridge Inc. has entered into a definitive agreement with WhiteWater/I Squared Capital and MPLX LP (“MPLX”) to form a joint-venture that will develop, construct, own, and operate natural gas pipeline and storage assets connecting Permian Basin natural gas supply to growing LNG and U.S. Gulf Coast demand, according to a news release.

Highlights:
  • Acquiring a meaningful, strategic equity interest in the joint venture
  • Immediately accretive to DCF per share, with ~90% contracted cash flows
  • Receiving immediate, recurring, and growing cash flow from operating assets with minimal commodity exposure
  • Optimizes balance sheet by increasing EBITDA and reducing Enbridge’s share of future Rio Bravo pipeline project capex proportional to its economic interest in that project
  • Embedded organic expansion opportunities provides attractive growth options and diversifies offtake

The joint venture will be owned by WhiteWater/I Squared (50.6%), MPLX (30.4%), and Enbridge (19.0%) and will include the following assets:

  • 100% interest in Whistler pipeline, a ~450-mile, 42-inch intrastate pipeline transporting natural gas from an interconnect with the Waha Header in the Permian Basin to Agua Dulce, TX, near the starting point of the proposed Rio Bravo pipeline
  • 100% interest in the Rio Bravo pipeline project, ~137-miles of new 42-inch and 48-inch pipelines transporting natural gas from the Agua Dulce supply area to NextDecade’s Rio Grande LNG project in Brownsville, Texas
  • 70% interest in ADCC pipeline, a ~40-mile, 42-inch proposed intrastate pipeline designed to transport 1.7 Bcf/d of natural gas from the terminus of the Whistler pipeline in Agua Dulce, TX to Cheniere’s Corpus Christi LNG export facility (the pipeline is expected to be in-service in Q3 2024 and is expandable up to 2.5 Bcf/d)
  • 50% interest in Waha Gas Storage, a ~2.0 Bcf gas storage cavern facility, with additional topside facilities capable of injection and withdrawal

Approximately 98% of capacity is contracted under long-term, take-or-pay contracts with an average contract length greater than 10 years. Approximately 90% of counterparties are investment grade and include leading operators in the Permian Basin.

Upon closing of the transaction, Enbridge will contribute its wholly-owned Rio Bravo pipeline project and $350m in cash to the joint venture, and will fund the first $150m of the post-closing capex to complete the Rio Bravo pipeline project. Enbridge will receive a 19% equity interest in the joint venture and retain a 25% economic interest in the Rio Bravo pipeline project (subject to certain redemption rights of the joint venture partners).

“Acquiring a meaningful equity interest in an integrated Permian natural gas pipeline and storage network that is directly connected to our existing infrastructure at Agua Dulce through this JV with WhiteWater/I Squared and MPLX is very exciting. This is a great way to enhance our super-system approach, bringing energy supply to places where it is needed most and providing last mile connectivity to domestic and export customers,” said Cynthia Hansen, EVP and President, Gas Transmission and Midstream of Enbridge.

Enbridge will be contributing its Rio Bravo pipeline project, which will extend the joint venture’s current infrastructure to serve LNG and other customers on the USGC. Enbridge’s share of the post-closing capex to complete the Rio Bravo pipeline project will be 100% of the first $150m and, thereafter, proportionate to its aggregate economic interest in that project.

This transaction is expected to unlock future growth opportunities for Enbridge to connect sustainable natural gas production to export markets as part of its USGC strategy.

“The transaction optimizes our investment capacity by increasing the efficiency of our capital. We will begin receiving immediate cash flow and will share in future growth opportunities,” said Pat Murray, EVP and Chief Financial Officer of Enbridge. “Having access to new Permian natural gas infrastructure enhances and increases the visibility of our medium-term growth outlook, while being accretive to our balance sheet.”

Closing is expected in the second quarter of 2024, subject to receipt of required regulatory approvals and satisfaction of other customary closing conditions.

Read More »

HIF, Idemitsu, and MOL to cooperate on e-fuels supply chain

HIF Global will assess demand for CO2 in its eFuels production facilities around the world. Idemitsu will study the capture of CO2 in Japan. MOL will examine the transportation and shipping of CO2 from Japan and eFuels to Japan.

HIF Global, an eFuels company, Idemitsu Kosan, the Japanese petroleum company and Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL), the international shipping company, have reached an agreement to develop an eFuels supply chain between HIF facilities and Japan.

The agreement also outlines how the companies will explore the potential for supplying carbon dioxide (CO2) from Japan for use as a feedstock for the eFuels production process in HIF facilities under development in the USAAustralia and Chile, according to a news release.

HIF Global will assess demand for CO2 in its eFuels production facilities around the world. Idemitsu will study the capture of CO2 in Japan. MOL will examine the transportation and shipping of CO2 from Japan and eFuels to Japan.

Cesar Norton, President & CEO of HIF Global, said: “At HIF Global, we are developing a portfolio of eFuels facilities that would recycle approximately 25 million tonnes per year of CO2, equivalent to the emissions from over 5 million cars. Carbon neutral eFuels are an immediate replacement for fossil fuels across the global transport sector. Initiatives like this collaboration will bring us a step closer to fueling our world with renewable energy as we strive towards net zero emissions now.”

Hiroshi Tanaka, General Manager (Carbon Neutral Transformation Department) of Idemitsu Kosan said: “As part of our commitment to sustainability, Idemitsu is actively working towards establishing a robust supply chain for eMethanol and eFuels. We recognize the importance of these low environmental impact alternatives in our business and their versatility. Through strategic collaborations such as this, we are confident in our ability to take a leading role in reducing carbon emissions in both the energy and transportation sectors. Additionally, we see tremendous potential in the development of various business opportunities within the supply chain. We look forward to exploring and capitalizing on these opportunities together.”

Hirofumi Kuwata, Senior Managing Executive Officer of MOL, said: “Mitsui O.S.K. Lines is pleased to be working with HIF Global and Idemitsu Kosan to develop a value chain for CO2, synthetic fuel, and synthetic methanol, contributing to decarbonization throughout the lifecycle. We will establish efficient maritime transport of CO2, synthetic methanol, and synthetic fuel within the supply chain connecting Japanese and overseas projects.”

The parties will also discuss the sale and purchase of eFuels and analyze the resulting greenhouse gas emissions reduction.

eFuels are made using electrolyzers powered by renewable energy to separate hydrogen from oxygen in water. The green hydrogen is combined with recycled carbon dioxide to produce carbon neutral eFuels, which are chemically equivalent to fuels used today and can therefore be dropped-in to existing engines without requiring any modifications.

Read More »
exclusive

US gas compression firm raising $432m

A Houston-based CNG company is raising money to develop a virtual marine pipeline between the US Gulf Coast and the Caribbean.

Andalusian Energy, a natural gas compression, export and transportation company, is undergoing a $432m capital raise to develop and build a compression and filling station in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana and export line to Honduras, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

Whitehall & Co. is advising on the transaction, the sources said. Capital allocation will also support the purchase of CNG containers and destination port improvements in Puerto Cortes, Honduras.

Targeted initial equity is $168m, or 40%, according to a teaser seen by The Hydrogen Source. Targeted COD of the project is 2H25.

Gross-cumulative investment could exceed $2bn. The phase I estimated project cost of approximately $421m is expected to be split 40% to permanent equity capital ($168m) and 60% to structured debt ($253m).

Andalusian uses lightweight composite cylinders to ship compressed natural gas (CNG) at ambient temperature to the Caribbean, Central America and eastern Mexico. Marketing materials state the process is lower cost than shipping liquefied natural gas (LNG).

The company has installed a demonstration facility in Choloma, Honduras to import natural gas from CNG.

The Louisiana compression facility will be constructed with two adjacent docks and a site with utility connections. Natural gas will be supplied using a combination of regional pipeline networks including Southern Natural Gas pipeline and High Point Gas Transmission Pipeline. An agreement has been reached to provide interconnection and construction of a 1.5 mile lateral.

Andalusian completed its development capital raise with a strategic investment by MAN Energy Solutions USA, a division of Volkswagen AG, and equity investments by HBG, Progressive Energy and Grupo IDC.

Additional marine engineering, consulting, and ship classification services are being provided by DNV GL and confirmed by the Norwegian Maritime Authority.

Additionally, to monetize spare ship capacity and based on a contract to deliver CNG to an IPP in Honduras, Andalusian has reached an agreement with a global shipping company to transport commercial container cargo between Louisiana and Honduras, the teaser states.

Read More »
exclusive

Carbon credit project developer planning equity raise

A Texas-based carbon credit firm is preparing to sell credits from its first project in the US southeast and planning its first equity raise in 2024.

Sky Harvest Carbon, the Dallas-based carbon credit project developer, is preparing to sell credits from its first project, roughly 30,000 acres of forest in the southeastern US, while looking toward its first equity raise in 2024, CEO and founder Will Clayton said in an interview.

In late 2024 the company will seek to raise between $5m and $10m in topco equity, depending on the outcome of grant applications, Clayton said. The company is represented by Scott Douglass & McConnico in Austin, Texas and does not have a relationship with a financial advisor.

Sky Harvest considers itself a project developer, using existing liquidity to pay landowners on the backend for timber rights, then selling credits based on the volume and age of the trees for $20 to $50 per credit (standardized as 1 mtpy of carbon).

The company will sell some 45,000 credits from its pilot project — comprised of acreage across Virginia, North Carolina, Louisiana and Mississippi – in 2024, Clayton said. The project involves 20 landowners.

Clayton, formerly chief of staff at North Carolina-based renewables and P2X developer Strata Clean Energy, owns a controlling stake in Sky Harvest Carbon. He said he’s self-funded operations to date, in part with private debt. The company is also applying for a multi-million-dollar grant based on working with small and underrepresented landowners.

“There’s a wall of demand… that’s coming against a supply constraint,” Clayton said of companies wanting to buy credits to meet carbon reduction goals.

Sky Harvest would be interested in working with companies wanting to secure supply or credits before price spikes, or investors wanting to acquire the credits as an asset prior to price spikes, Clayton said.

“Anybody who wants to go long on carbon, either as an investment thesis or for the climate benefits to offset operational footprint, it’s a great way to do it by locking supply at a low cost,” he said.

A novel approach to credit definition

Carbon credits on the open market vary widely in verifications standards and price; they can cost anywhere from $1 to $2,000.

“There’s a long process for all the measurements and verifications,” Clayton said.

There are many forestry carbon developers paying landowners for environmental benefits and selling those credits. Where Sky Harvest is unique is its attempt to redefine the carbon credit, Clayton said.

The typical definition of 1 mtpy of CO2 is problematic, as it does not gauge for duration of storage, he said. Carbon emitted into the atmosphere can stay there indefinitely.

“If you’re storing carbon for 10, 20, 30 years, the scales don’t balance,” Clayton said. “That equation breaks and it’s not truly an offset.”

Sky Harvest is quantifying the value of carbon over time by equating volume with duration, Clayton said.

“If you have one ton of carbon dioxide going into the atmosphere forever on one side of the scale, you need multiple tons of carbon dioxide stored on the other side of the scale if it’s for any time period other than forever,” he said, noting that credit providers often cannot guarantee that the protected trees will never be harvested. Sky Harvest inputs more than 1 ton per credit, measured in periods of five years guaranteed storage at a time. “We compensate for the fact that it’s not going to be stored there forever.”

Monitoring protected land is expensive and often difficult to sustain. Carbon markets work much like conservation easements, but those easements often lose effect over time as oversight diminishes (typically because of staffing or funding shortages at the often nonprofit groups charged with monitoring).

“That doesn’t work in any other industry with real physical commodities,” Clayton said. “The way every other industry works is you pay a fund delivery. That’s our measure-as-you-go approach.”

A similar methodology has been put forward by the United Nations and has been adopted in Quebec, Clayton said.

Read More »
exclusive

Green hydrogen developer in active discussions for California FID this year

A green hydrogen developer is in active discussions with counterparties as it pursues a final investment decision for its first project.

Houston-based green hydrogen developer Element Resources is in active discussions to reach FID this year on its first green hydrogen project slated for Lancaster, California.

The company had engaged Houlihan Lokey in recent months to lead a capital raise for the project, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The Houlihan mandate had involved raising non-dilutive debt, a process that is believed to have been shelved, said one of the sources.

“We are steadily working our way to an FID this year and are pulling together all parts of the project,” Element CFO Avery Barnebey said via email in response to inquiries. He declined to comment further.

A Houlihan representative did not respond to an email seeking comment.

The Lancaster facility, which is targeted to begin commercial operations in early 2025, will be built on 1,165 acres and consist of 135 MW of solar-powered electrolysis capacity, according to the company’s website. At full capacity, the 18,750 mt per annum of hydrogen produced by the facility will serve the growing demand for clean mobility fuels as well as clean energy for manufacturing.

Element is led by founder and CEO Steve Meheen, an oil & gas industry veteran. Barnebey is a former director of corporate development at California Resources Corporation.

Read More »

Welcome Back

Get Started

Sign up for a free 15-day trial and get the latest clean fuels news in your inbox.