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Drax Group reaches carbon removal deal for US projects

The deal, which will occur over a five-year period starting in 2030, is linked to Drax's planned deployment of bioenergy with carbon capture facilities in the US.

Carbon removals and renewable energy company Drax Group today announced a new carbon removals deal with Karbon-X, a leading environmental company.

Karbon-X will purchase carbon dioxide removals (CDR) credits from Drax representing 25,000 metric tons of permanently stored carbon at $350 per tonne under the terms of the agreement.

The deal, which will occur over a five-year period starting in 2030, is linked to Drax’s planned deployment of carbon negative BECCS in the United States, according to a news release.

“We’re excited to work with organizations like Karbon-X that understand the importance of investing in high-value carbon removals today,” said Laurie Fitzmaurice, President, Carbon Removals at Drax. “The CDR market, which is already maturing at a rapid pace, is expected to experience a supply crunch within the next decade as companies and countries approach their deadlines for carbon reduction targets.”

The agreement with Karbon-X is the latest in a string of previously announced carbon removals memorandums of understanding that have included Respira and C-Zero. Drax also launched a new independent business unit earlier this year that is focused on becoming the global leader in large-scale carbon removals. This business unit will oversee the development and construction of Drax’s new-build BECCS plants in the US and internationally, and it will work with a coalition of strategic partners to focus on an ambitious goal of removing at least 6 Mt of CO2 per year from the atmosphere.

BECCS is a carbon removal technology that uses sustainably sourced biomass to generate renewable energy while permanently sequestering the carbon underground. Measuring the impact of these high-quality carbon removals is more straightforward when compared with other solutions like nature-based removals, resulting in high demand, according to the company.

“This agreement with Karbon-X represents another major step forward in delivering BECCS by Drax in the United States to help meet this growing demand to decarbonize our planet,” said Fitzmaurice.

Karbon-X intends to sell the credits it purchases from Drax on the voluntary carbon market, enabling individuals and organizations to achieve their own emissions reduction targets. It follows a stringent set of guidelines to ensure it selects only high-quality projects and providers, like BECCS by Drax.

As companies, industries, and countries increasingly look to engineered carbon removals to ensure they can meet their climate commitments, CDRs from carbon negative BECCS are becoming an integral piece of this market. Through BECCS, carbon removals are quantifiable and auditable, resulting in a higher quality credit. This separates BECCS-derived CDRs from carbon offsets, allowing organizations to have greater trust in the impact of their investments, according to the release.

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Raven SR brings in Chevron and Hyzon for California waste-to-hydrogen project

Chevron New Energies and Hyzon Motors are strategic investors in Raven SR, and have joined the Richmond, California project as owners and offtakers.

Raven SR, a renewable fuels company, Chevron New Energies, a division of Chevron U.S.A., a subsidiary of Chevron Corporation, and Hyzon Motors Inc. are collaborating to commercialize operations of a green waste-to-hydrogen production facility in Richmond intended to supply hydrogen fuel to transportation markets in Northern California.

The facility will be owned by a newly formed company, Raven SR S1 LLC (Raven SR S1). Raven SR will be the operator of the facility, which is targeted to come online in the first quarter of 2024. Chevron holds a 50% equity stake in Raven SR 1. Raven SR holds a 30% stake and Hyzon owns the remaining 20%.

To produce the hydrogen, the project is expected to divert up to 99 wet tons of green and food waste per day from Republic Services’ West Contra Costa Sanitary Landfill into its non-combustion Steam/CO2 Reforming process, producing up to 2,400 metric-tons per year of renewable hydrogen. Diversion of this organic waste will help fulfill California’s SB 1383 mandates, and will potentially avoid up to 7,200 metric-tons per year of CO2 emissions from the landfill. In addition, Raven’s technology uses no fresh water, an important element given drought risks in California, and uses less electricity to power its units than competing processes. The project is expected to produce at least 60% of its own electricity by upgrading the currently permitted and zoned landfill gas electric generators at the landfill, further reducing both the current air emissions and the need for grid power for its non-combustion process.

Chevron plans to market its share of the hydrogen in Bay Area and Northern California fueling stations, enabling the energy transition to zero emission vehicles. Hyzon, a global supplier of fuel cell electric commercial vehicles, plans to provide refueling for hydrogen fuel cell trucks at a hydrogen hub in Richmond.

“Our strategic partners’ commitment to the first non-combustion Steam/CO2 facility in the world will help drive our commercial operations in Richmond and accelerate similar facilities globally,” said Matt Murdock, CEO of Raven. “This facility will be the first hydrogen production plant in the world to reduce greenhouse gases, including critically important short-lived climate pollutants, through its process and its product. By removing waste from the landfill, it will help reduce methane emissions. Not only will the greater Richmond community benefit from reduced emissions, investments, and jobs, it will also see economic benefits as local gas stations have a consistent supply of clean, zero-carbon hydrogen fuel for fuel cell vehicles. We are grateful to work with partners who share our mission to make cleaner fuel options available as soon as possible.”

Ahead of teaming with Raven SR on the Raven SR S1 facility, Chevron and Hyzon were among Raven SR’s initial strategic investors, along with ITOCHU, Ascent Hydrogen Fund and Samsung Ventures.

“We are excited about this collaboration and our expanded commitment to Raven and its waste-to-hydrogen technology,” said Austin Knight, vice president of Hydrogen for Chevron New Energies. “Not only are we positioned to commercialize a first-of-its-kind lower carbon hydrogen project, we are working to reduce emissions in a community in which we have a long and proud history. With a relatively short lead time, we will be able to further develop the hydrogen ecosystem in the region.”

The Raven SR technology is a non-combustion thermal, chemical reductive process that converts organic waste and landfill gas to hydrogen and Fischer-Tropsch synthetic fuels. Unlike other hydrogen production technologies, its Steam/CO2 Reformation does not require fresh water as a feedstock and uses less than half the energy of electrolysis. The process is more efficient than conventional hydrogen production and can deliver fuel with low to negative carbon intensity. Additionally, Raven SR’s goal is to generate as much of its own power onsite as possible to reduce reliance on, and/or be independent of the grid. Its modular design provides a scalable means to locally produce renewable hydrogen and synthetic liquid fuels from local waste.

“The Richmond hub enables a local, renewable hydrogen ecosystem by aligning hydrogen production, refueling infrastructure and vehicle availability geographically and technologically. This alignment is expected to reduce total costs to fleet operators, accelerating the transition to zero-emissions vehicles and global decarbonization,” said Parker Meeks, Hyzon president and interim CEO.

“This marks a significant step in demonstrating the commercial viability of a localized, low-to-negative carbon intensity hydrogen economy,” he added. “Through Hyzon’s partnership with Raven, hydrogen supply can be synchronized with the demand for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles. Raven’s deployment of scalable hydrogen production facilities allows supply and demand to grow together as clean hydrogen for transport continues to gain market and regulatory support.”

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Bloom Energy starts new commercial electrolyzer line

The new line increases the company’s generating capacity of electrolyzers to 2 GW.

Bloom Energy Corporation has inaugurated its high volume commercial electrolyzer line at the company’s plant in Newark, Delaware, according to a press release.

The new line increases the company’s generating capacity of electrolyzers to 2 GW.

In the last decade, the facility has produced over 1 gigawatt (GW) of fuel cell-based Energy Servers. The Bloom Electrolyzer relies on the same solid oxide technology platform used to produce electricity, so the company can streamline existing manufacturing.

The technology is being demonstrated in partnerships withand Idaho National Labs to harness nuclear and steam power, and will be demonstrated with LSB Industries, Inc. to decarbonize industrial and agricultural sectors. Internationally, the technology is in use in South Korea.

In July of this year Bloom Energy opened a 164,000 square foot, multi-gigawatt facility in Fremont, California, representing USD 200m in investment and bringing Bloom’s California headcount to nearly 2,000 in addition to its 715 Delaware employees.

Bloom recently announced plans to install a 240-kW electrolyzer at the Xcel Energy Prairie Island nuclear plant in Welch, Minnesota.

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French e-fuels developer takes investment from private equity pair

A French developer of low-carbon molecules has taken a convertible bond investment for its most advanced e-methanol and SAF projects in France and Spain.

Hy24 and Mirova are co-investing in Elyse Energy’s most advanced e-methanol projects in France and Spain, with industrial commissioning scheduled for 2027 and 2028.

Nomura Greentech acted as exclusive financial advisor to Elyse Energy. Legal advisors included CLP – Cliperton Avocats for Elyse Energy and Gide for Hy24 and Mirova, the companies said in a news release.

Hy24 is the hydrogen-focused wing of French private equity firm Ardian and Mirova is an affiliate of Natixis Investment Managers. The firms have undertaken the equity investment through their respective funds – the Hy24 Clean Infrastructure Fund and the Mirova Energy Transition 5 fund.

The transaction was carried out through convertible bonds, and Mirova and Hy24 are not shareholders of Elyse Energy, a spokesperson said in response to follow-up questions.

Additional terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

The money will allow Elyse Energy to recruit new employees and to continue development through feasibility studies, the industrialisation phase, and beyond. 

Elyse’s eM-Rhône project, awarded by the European Innovation Fund, is targeting production of 150,000 mtpy of green e-methanol annually for the maritime sector and industry. The BioTJet project in Pyrénées Atlantiques, France is in advanced stages with annual production set at 75,000 mtpy of e-biokerosene and 3,000 mtpy of naphtha..  

The company will deploy some 2.5 GW of installed capacity (1m mtpy) of e-methanol and 200,000 mtpy of SAF. The fuels will go to offtakers in aviation, maritime transport, and industrial processes in sectors such as chemicals.

Hy24 recently closed on a €1.5bn equity private placement in North America’s H2 Green Steel, together with existing investors Altor, GIC and Just Climate.
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Exclusive: E-fuels developer raising $500m

A developer of green hydrogen for e-fuel products is looking for a more diverse set of backers for a recently launched Series C capital raise.

Ineratec, the German power-to-liquid fuels developer and technology provider, has launched a $500m Series C and could take on a US-based financial advisor to help, CEO Tim Boeltken said in an interview.

German boutique Pava Partners helped Ineratec on its $129m Series B, which was led by Piva Capital. The Series B raise, which was announced in January, also included participation from HG Ventures, TDK Ventures, Copec WIND Ventures, RockCreek, Emerald, Samsung Ventures as well as the increased support from current investors, including global corporates like ENGIE New Ventures, Safran Corporate Ventures and Honda.

The Series C can include equity, debt and project finance, Boeltken said.

The company, which takes a modular approach to fuels production, serves customers in Switzerland, Spain and Finland. Its e-fuels process involves two main steps: first, turning CO2 and hydrogen into synthesis gas, then using a second reactor to turn the synthesis gas into liquid and solid hydrocarbons, according to its website.

Growth in the US would include eventual rollout of its 100 MW commercial unit, none of which have been built to date. Now the company is focused on its 10 MW commercial units, following completion of a 1 MW industrial plant operating now.

In the next month Ineratec will be scouting locations in the US, Boeltken said, adding the the company is “hoping for many, many US installations” with eyes on additional applications in South America and Japan. The company also intends to establish a US headquarters.

Sites in New York and California are of first interest but there are also growth intentions in Texas, Washington state and Appalachia.

Ineratec is currently raising project finance for a “triple-digit” million capex project in the Europe, he said.

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California biomass-to-hydrogen firm in Series A

A woody biomass-to-hydrogen firm in California is conducting an in-house Series A for engineering and design on its first project, one that will need more than $800m of debt and equity in the future.

Mote Inc. is aiming to finish a Series A round, raising between $12m and $15m, by the end of the year, CEO Joshuah Stolaroff said in an interview.

The company does not have a relationship with a financial advisor and has been conducting the raise in-house, he said. Moving forward the company will need a financial advisor.

The Series A will provide some 18 months of technology development runway, plus engineering and design on the first project in Bakersfield, Kern County. That will require some $800m in debt and project equity to start in the next year.

A second project in Sacramento is in the pre-Feed stage. That development is the subject of a recently secured grant from the Sacramento Municipal Utility District.

“We need big partners to do it on any meaningful scale,” Stolaroff said of biomass-to-hydrogen. Investors tend to be technology VCs with little or no knowledge of project finance, and infra funds looking for no-risk projects. “We fall somewhere in between.”

Part of the Arches H2 hub in California, Mote has ambitions to expand to other areas of the US with good biomass supply and CO2 storage, like the southeast and Gulf Coast, Stolaroff said. The company would also like to expand internationally.

“We are a great deal right now,” he said of the Series A,” adding that a Series B or project equity round will follow shortly.

Majority equity is held by the company’s six employees, Stolaroff said. There are also seed investors that hold equity.

Abundant feedstock and a growing offtake market

Mote’s three primary feedstocks are agricultural and forestry reside and urban green waste. California produces some 45m tons of it per year and the number nationwide is about half-a-billion, Stolaroff said.

Mote is confident for demand from hydrogen customers, Stoaroff said. Transportation is expected to be a strong demand source by the time Mote is operational. The Arches hub also has connections with municipal users, filling stations and the ports of LA and Long Beach.

“We are all planning for growth,” he said.

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Waste-to-energy company interviewing advisors for strategic capital raise

Vancouver-based Klean Industries plans to run a process to raise between $250m – $500m of capital to deploy into projects, some of which would use green hydrogen to upgrade recovered fuel and pyrolysis oils.

Waste-to-energy specialist Klean Industries is interviewing financial advisors and planning to run a process to find investors for a strategic capital raise.

The Vancouver-based company is seeking to raise between $250m – $500m in a minority stake sale that would value the company around $1bn, Klean CEO Jesse Klinkhamer said in an interview.

Klean had previously intended to list on the NASDAQ exchange but those plans were nixed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, he said. The company still plans to list publicly in 2024 or 2025.

Proceeds from a capital raise now would be used to “rapidly deploy” into the projects that Klean is advancing around the globe, Klinkhamer said.

For one of those projects – a flagship tire pyrolysis plant in Boardman, Oregon – Klean is raising non-recourse debt to finance construction, the executive said. Klinkhammer declined to name the advisor for the project financing but said news would be out soon and added that the company has aligned itself with infrastructure funds willing to provide non-recourse debt for the facility.

The Boardman project, which is expected to cost roughly $135m, is an expansion of an existing site where Klean will use its advanced thermal conversion technology to recover fuel oil, steel, and refined carbon black from recycled tires. The end products are comparable to virgin commodities with the exception of being more cost-effective with a lower carbon footprint.

“A lot of what we do is of paramount interest to a lot of the ESG-focused infrastructure investors that are focused on assets that tick all the boxes,” Klinkhamer said, noting the consistent output of the waste-to-energy plants that Klean is building along with predictable prices for energy sourced from renewable power.

Klean has also partnered with H2Core Systems, a maker of containerized green hydrogen production plants, and Enapter, an electrolyzer manufacturer. The company will install a 1 MW electrolyzer unit at the Boardman facility, with the green hydrogen used to upgrade recovered fuel oil and pyrolysis oil into e-fuels that meet California’s Low Carbon Fuels Standards.

“We were exploring how we could improve the quality of the tire pyrolysis oil so that it could enter the LCFS market in California,” he said, “because there are significant carbon credits and tax incentives associated with the improved product.”

The company received proposals from industrial gas companies to bring hydrogen to the Boardman facility that were not feasible, and Klean opted for producing electrolytic hydrogen on site in part due to the abundance of low-cost hydroelectric power and water from the nearby Columbia River.

Addressable market

Discussing Klean’s addressable market for waste-to-energy projects, Klinkhamer points to Japan as an example of a comparable “mature” market.

Japan, an island nation of 126 million people, has built roughly 5,000 resource recovery, waste-to-energy plants of various scopes and designations, he notes. For comparison, the United Kingdom – another island nation of 67 million people – has just 20 waste-to-energy plants.

“The opportunity for waste-to-energy in the UK alone is mind boggling,” he said. “There are a thousand opportunities of scope and scale. Nevermind you’ve got an aging, outdated electrical infrastructure, limited landfills, landfill taxes rising – a tsunami of issues, plus the ESG advent.”

A similar opportunity exists in North America, he noted, where there are around 100 waste-to-energy plants for 580 million people. The company is working on additional tire, plastic, and waste-to-energy projects in North America, and also has projects in Australia and Europe.

Hydrogen could be the key to advancing more projects: waste-to-energy plants have typically been hamstrung by a reliance on large utilities to convert energy generated from waste into electricity, which is in turn dependent on transmission. But the plants could instead produce hydrogen, which can be more easily and cost effectively distributed, Klinkhamer said.

“There is now an opportunity to build these same plants, but rather than rely on the electrical side of things where you’re dealing with a utility, to convert that energy into hydrogen and distribute it to the marketplace,” he added.

Hydrogen infrastructure

Klinkhamer says the company is also examining options for participating in a network of companies that could transform the logistics for bringing feedstock to the Boardman facility and taking away the resulting products.

The company has engaged in talks with long-haul truckers as well as refining companies and industrial gas providers about creating a network of hydrogen hubs – akin to a “Tesla network” – that would support transportation logistics.

“It made sense for us to look at opportunities for moving our feedstock via hydrogen-powered vehicles, and also have refueling stations and hydrogen production plants that we build in North America,” he said.

Klean would need seven to 12 different hubs to supply its transportation network, Klinkhamer estimates, while the $350m price tag for the infrastructure stems from the geographic reach of the hubs as well as the sheer volume of hydrogen required for fueling needs.

“With the Inflation Reduction Act, the U.S. has set itself up to be the lowest-cost producer of hydrogen in the world, which will really spur the development of hydrogen logistics for getting hydrogen out,” he said. “And to get to scale, it’s going to require some big investments.”

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