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PowerCell serving H2 fuel stacks to ZeroAvia

The agreementcomprises 5,000 hydrogen fuel cell stacks with deliveries planned to start in 2024.

PowerCell has signed the world’s first contract covering the serial delivery of hydrogen fuel stacks to the aviation industry, according to a press release.

The agreement, potentially valued up to SEK 1.51bn, is conditioned on client ZeroAvia obtaining necessary certifications. It comprises 5,000 hydrogen fuel cell stacks with deliveries planned to start in 2024.

Approximately SEK 25m of the order value is expected to impact revenues in 2022.

ZeroAvia focuses on hydrogen-electric aviation solutions and aims to launch a 19-seat aircraft with 300-mile range by 2025. The American and British company acquired California-based fuel cell stack innovator HyPoint this month.

The total order value of SEK 1.51 billion is conditional on ZeroAvia obtaining necessary certifications of the powertrain.

PowerCell will, upon completed aviation certifications, deliver a total of 0.5 GW fuel cells comprising of 300 kW superstack modules based on the industrialized 100 kW fuel cell stack. The fuel stacks will be used by ZeroAvia to manufacture a 600 kW, low-temperature, hydrogen-electric powertrain for the certified 19-seat, fuel cell-powered commercial aircraft.

As part of the agreement, PowerCell will establish a unit in the UK for final assembly and the adaptation of the stacks to ZeroAvia’s fuel cell system and application.

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Evercore managing director moves to NextEra

A well-known Evercore managing director has made a career move into hydrogen, taking an executive director position at NextEra.

Sean Morgan, a former public equity market analyst at Evercore who made television appearances on CNBC, has taken a new position within the hydrogen business at NextEra Energy Resources.

Morgan, who as an analyst covered the LNG and clean energy markets, took a role as executive director of hydrogen market analytics at NextEra in August, according to his LinkedIn profile. He ended at Evercore as a managing director.

Prior to joining Evercore, Morgan worked as a portfolio manager at Blue Shores Capital, and also worked on the leveraged credit team at SocGen.

NextEra is evaluating a potential $20bn pipeline of hydrogen projects.

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Hydrogen tech firm looking for distribution partners with eye on Series B

A Florida-based hydrogen technology company is hoping to find strategic partners with distribution networks as part of its impending Series A capital raise, with an eye on a much larger Series B later.

BoMax Hydrogen, the Florida-based hydrogen production technology firm, is searching for strategic partners with distribution networks as part of its soon-to-launch Series A capital raise, CEO Chris Simuro said in an interview.

BoMax, founded in 2014 and headquartered in Orlando, will launch a $15m Series A on November 1, Simuro said. The company has hired Taylor DeJongh to run the process, as recently reported by ReSource.

Greenberg Traurig is the company’s law firm, Simuro said. They use a regional accountant in Florida.

Taylor DeJongh is looking for three to five investors to put in between $3m and $5m each. BoMax is in discussions with French container shipping company CMA-CGM as a potential investor, he said.

“We are truly searching for distribution partners,” Simuro said, adding that company doesn’t envision itself touching the end-use customer.

The Series A funds should provide up to 24 months of runway and expand the company’s manufacturing capacity, Simuro said. A follow-on Series B capital raise will likely be $100m or more.

BoMax has raised some $5m to date, including from state government aerospace economic development agency Space Florida.

Funds from the Series A will be used to make a beta prototype, scale operations at the company’s labs in Orlando and prepare for commercial production.

No electrolysis

The company touts a novel technology making hydrogen from visible light without the need for solar electrolysis, according to a pre-teaser marketing document seen by ReSource. An alpha prototype has been awarded by the US Department of Energy.

Requiring a larger footprint, electrolysis can ultimately produce 38 liters of hydrogen per hour per square meter, Simuro said. BoMax believes it can reach 50 liters per hour in six months time.

“It replicates how hydrogen is made in the natural world,” Simuro said. “In order to do this globally, we are going to need partners.”

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IEA report outlines case for cost reductions in e-fuels

The International Energy Agency assesses needed cost reductions, resources and infrastructure investments for achieving a 10% share of e-fuels in aviation and shipping by 2030.

The International Energy Agency’s report on the role of e-fuels in decarbonizing transport finds that e-fuels’ cost gap with fossil fuels could substantially reduce by 2030, an important finding for the advancement of a family of emerging e-fuel technologies. 

In the report, which was published last month, the IEA aims to assess the implications of growth in e-fuels in terms of needed cost reductions, resources and infrastructure investments of an assumed goal of achieving a 10% share of e-fuels in aviation and shipping by 2030. 

For instance, the cost of low-emission e-kerosene might drop to $50/GJ ($2,150 per ton), making it competitive with biomass-based sustainable aviation fuels – but still 2 – 3x more expensive than fossil-based fuels. 

The costs for low-emission e-methanol and e-ammonia could also decrease, opening the door for their use as low-emission fuels in shipping. Interestingly, the production of e-fuels for aviation will also result in a significant amount of e-gasoline as a by-product, the report notes.

In terms of impact on transport prices, a 10% share of low-emission e-fuels would only modestly increase the cost of transport, according to the report. For example, e-kerosene would raise the ticket price of a flight using 10% of e-fuels by only 5%. 

However, the adoption of e-methanol and e-ammonia in shipping will necessitate significant investments in infrastructure and ships. The overall cost for a fully e-ammonia or e-methanol-fueled container ship would be 75% higher than a conventional fossil-fuel-powered ship, yet this represents just 1-2% of the typical value of goods transported in these containers.

The production of e-fuels generally suffers from low efficiency due to multiple conversion steps and losses, leading to high resource and infrastructure demand, according to the report. Producing significant amounts of low-emission e-fuels could increase the demand for renewable electricity by about 2,000 TWh/yr by 2030. This represents about one-fifth of the growth of low-emission electricity expected in this decade under certain policy scenarios. 

The production of e-fuels can exploit the potential of remote locations with high-quality renewable resources and vast land available for large-scale projects. However, achieving a 10% share of e-fuels in aviation and shipping would require a significant increase in electrolyser capacity, equivalent to the entire size of the global electrolyser project pipeline to 2030.

The accelerated deployment of low-emission e-fuels for shipping would require substantial investments in refueling infrastructure and vessels, especially for e-ammonia or e-methanol. Achieving a 10% share in shipping would demand approximately 70 Mt/yr of these fuels. The financial investment in shipping capacity and bunkering infrastructure would be substantial, yet represent less than 5% of the cumulative shipbuilding market size over the period 2023-2030.

Producing carbon-containing low-emission e-kerosene and e-methanol would necessitate a massive increase in CO₂ utilization, with significant potential synergy with biofuels production. Around 200 Mt CO₂ would be required for a 10% share of e-kerosene in aviation and 150 Mt CO₂ for the same share in shipping if using e-methanol. 

Access to CO₂ is a major constraint for carbon-containing low-emission e-fuels, and the best wind and solar resources are not always co-located with significant bioenergy resources. Direct air capture (DAC) of CO₂ could provide an unlimited source of CO₂ feedstock without geographic constraints, but it is expected to remain a high-cost option in 2030, the report projects.

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Exclusive: Inside Strata’s P2X strategy

Strata Clean Energy is seeking to engage with global chemical, energy, and shipping companies as a potential partner for a pipeline of green hydrogen projects that will have FIDs in 2025 and CODs later this decade.

Strata Clean Energy is developing a pipeline of green hydrogen projects that will produce large amounts of green ammonia and other hydrogen derivatives later this decade.

Mike Grunow, executive vice president and general manager of Strata’s Power-to-X platform, said in an interview that the company is investing in the development of proprietary modeling and optimization software that forms part of its strategy to de-risk Power-to-X projects for compliance with strict 45V tax credit standards.

“We’re anticipating having the ability to produce substantial amounts of low-carbon ammonia in the back half of this decade from a maturing pipeline of projects that we’ve been developing, and we’re looking to collaborate with global chemical, energy, and shipping companies on the next steps for these projects,” he said.

Strata’s approach to potential strategic offtakers could also include the partner taking an equity stake in projects, “with the right partner,” Grunow said. The projects are expected to reach FID in 2025.

Grunow declined to comment on the specific size or regional focus of the projects.

“We aspire for the projects to be as large as possible,” he said. “All of the projects are in deep discussions with the regional transmission providers to determine the schedule at which more and more transmission capacity can be made available.”

Strata will apply its expertise in renewable energy to the green hydrogen industry, he said, which involves the deployment of unique combinations of renewable energy, energy storage, and energy trading to deliver structured products to large industrial clients, municipal utilities and regulated utilities.

The company “commits to providing 100% hourly matched renewable energy over a guaranteed set of hours over the course of an entire year for 10 – 20 years,” Grunow said.

“It’s our expectation that the European regulations and more of the global regulations, and the guidance from the US Treasury will require that the clean energy supply projects are additional, deliverable within the same ISO/RTO, and that, eventually, the load of the electrolyzer will need to follow the production of the generation,” he said.

Strata’s strategy for de-risking compliance with the Inflation Reduction Act’s 45V revenue stream for green hydrogen will give asset-level lenders certainty on the delivery of a project’s IRA incentives.

“Right now, if I’m looking at a project with an hourly matched 45V revenue stream, I have substantial doubt about that project’s ability to actually staple the hourly matched RECs to the amount of hydrogen produced in an hour, to the ton of hydrogen derivative,” he said.

During the design phase, developers evaluate multiple electrolyzer technologies, hourly matching of variable generation, price uncertainty and carbon intensity of the grid, plant availability and maintenance costs along with evolving 45V compliance requirements.

Meanwhile, during the operational phase, complex revenue streams need to be optimized. In certain markets with massive electrical loads, an operator has the opportunity to earn demand response and ancillary service revenues, Grunow said.

Optimal operations

“The key to maximizing the value of these assets is optimal operations,” he said, noting project optionality between buying and selling energy, making and storing hydrogen, and using hydrogen to make a derivative such as ammonia or methanol.

Using its software, Strata can make a complete digital twin of a proposed plant in the design phase, which accounts for the specifications of the commercially available electrolyzer families.

Strata analyzes an hourly energy supply schedule for every project it evaluates, across 8,760 hours a year and 20 years of expected operating life. It can then cue up that digital project twin – with everything known about the technology options, their ability to ramp and turn down, and the drivers of degradation – and analyze optimization for different electrolyzer operating formats. 

“It’s fascinating right now because the technology development cycle is happening in less than 12 months, so every year you need to check back in with all the vendors,” he said. “This software tool allows us to do that in a hyper-efficient way.”

A major hurdle the green hydrogen industry still needs to overcome, according to Grunow, is aligning the commercial aspects of electrolysis with its advances in technological innovation.

“The lender at the project level needs the technology vendor to take technology and operational risk for 10 years,” he said. “So you need a long-term service agreement, an availability guarantee, key performance metric guarantees on conversion efficiency,” he said, “and those guarantees must have liquidated damages for underperformance, and those liquidated damages must be backstopped by a limitation of liability and a domestic entity with substantial credit. Otherwise these projects won’t get financed.”

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EverWind in capital raise for Nova Scotia wind-to-hydrogen complex

EverWind Fuels is soliciting investor bids for a $1bn initial phase of its Point Tupper renewables and hydrogen/ammonia production facility in Atlantic Canada.

EverWind Fuels, the Canada-based renewable fuels developer, is preparing to launch a process to raise an estimated $800m in debt for its Point Tupper ammonia production and export facility near Halifax, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

Citi and CIBC are mandated on the raise.

The company is seeking capital from a variety of investors, one of the sources said. The raise will likely conclude around the middle of the year with Citi stepping up for part of the debt quantum.

EverWind is also in talks with Canadian Infrastructure Bank, one of the sources said.

EverWind, Citi, CIBC and CIB did not respond to requests for comment.

Nova Scotia’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change recently approved the Point Tupper Green Hydrogen/Ammonia Project – Phase 1. Construction should begin this year on phase 1 of the project, consisting of a 300 MW electrolysis plant along with a 600 tonnes-per-day ammonia production facility. The project also involves construction of a liquid ammonia pipeline to a jetty for international shipping and a 230 kW substation that will bring in electricity.

Government support for the project is leading to offtake agreements needed to build out a hydrogen supply chain at scale, a third source said. The project is nearing a $200m offtake agreement for green hydrogen with a large global manufacturer, this source added.

The German groups E.ON and Uniper said in August that they aim to buy up to 500,000 tonnes per year of ammonia each from EverWind, starting in 2025, when the project is set to begin production.

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US hydrogen and LNG developer raising capital

A Texas-based project developer is conducting a development capital raise for a flagship LNG and green hydrogen project in the Northeast.

New Energy Development Company, a Katy, Texas-based developer with offices in Boston, Texas, is raising between $5m and $8m for an LNG liquefaction, storage and re-gasification facility with additional green hydrogen production and storage, Partner Scott Shields said in an interview.

The company is not using a financial advisor, Shields said, noting that a larger second round capital raise will likely start near the beginning of 2024.

New Energy has secured a brownfield site for a peak-shaving LNG facility in New England with 2 billion cubic feet of storage capacity and 50 MW of solar pv, Shields said. Also planned is an expandable 40 MW PEM electrolyzer line.

He declined to name the state in which the project is located, adding that the company is trying to put a strong support system and marketing plan in place before the location is made public.

The proceeds of the capital raise will go in part to hiring local lawyers and engineering and design work (pre-FEED and FEED), through to FID, Shields said. The project will be built in two phases, Phase 1 being the LNG component and Phase 2 focusing on green hydrogen.

The LNG facility will be the offtaker for the hydrogen, which will run the plant when the solar is insufficient. Through an open season process New Energy has identified five investment grade offtakers for the LNG.

Ramping capex

“We’ve been self-funding up until now,” Shields said of New Energy, which has also put capital and development resources into half-a-dozen other projects around the country.

It’s time for a ramp up in capital expenditures and New Energy is in discussions with strategic and private equity providers, Shields said, noting that the company would prefer the former. Discussions include options to fund just the flagship project, as well as platform equity.

Shields noted that he has investment banking experience and that New Energy Managing Partner Alexander “Hap” Ellis serves as chairman of Old Westbury Funds and the George and Barbara Bush Foundation.

New Energy has partnered with McDermott International to develop patented GreenER hydrogen facilities, a modular, expandable hydrogen facility that can produce 24,000 kg per day (2,760 MMBtu) of renewable hydrogen. The companies in 2021 completed engineering deliverables for multiple designs which are marketed as ideal for grid-scale blending with natural gas pipelines, blending for existing or new power generating facilities and storage injection into salt caverns and above ground storage tanks.

The company has also combined GreenER LNG and hydrogen production and storage plants into an integrated energy hub, capable of producing an additional 200,000 MMBtu of LNG.

New Energy recently hired Chico DaFonte, formerly a vice president at Liberty Utilities, a subsidiary of Algonquin Power, as executive vice president working on LNG and hydrogen projects.

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