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Air Products consortium completes $8.5bn financing for Saudi green hydrogen project

Senior and mezzanine debt along with equity raised on a non-recourse basis will support the construction of 4 GW of renewables powering production of 600 tons of hydrogen per day.

Pennsylvania-based Air Products along with ACWA Power and NEOM Company have finalized and signed an $8.5bn financing agreement for a green hydrogen project in Saudi Arabia.

To be funded by a combination of long-term debt and equity, the project JV, NEOM Green Hydrogen Project, will build 4 GW of renewables powering production of up to 600 tons per day of hydrogen.

The total financing consists of $5.852bn of senior debt and $475m of mezzanine debt facilities, both arranged on a non-recourse project finance basis, as follows:

– $1,500 million from National Development Fund (NDF) on behalf of National Infrastructure Fund (NIF), under foundation.

– $1,250 million is in the form of SAR denominated financing from Saudi Industrial Development Fund (SIDF),

The balance is from a consortium of financiers, structured as a combination of long term uncovered tranches and a Euler Hermes covered tranche, comprising, in no particular order, First Abu Dhabi Bank, HSBC, Standard Chartered Bank, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, BNP Paribas, Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank, Natixis, Saudi British Bank, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, Saudi National Bank, KFW, Riyad Bank, Norinchukin Bank, Mizuho Bank, Banque Saudi Fransi, Alinma Bank, APICORP, JP Morgan, DZ Bank, Korea Development Bank and Credit Agricole.

Air Products, which is the sole offtaker for the project, recently disclosed that the cost of the facility has climbed to $8.5bn compared to an original capital estimate of $5bn.

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European Union gives 213m to Faurecia for clean mobility

Faurecia will develop lightweight carbon fiber gaseous hydrogen tanks as well as a tank to store hydrogen in cryogenic form.

Faurecia, a subsidiary of the French FORVIA Group, will receive EUR 213m from to develop lightweight carbon fiber gaseous hydrogen tanks as well as a tank to store hydrogen in cryogenic form, according to a news release.

The money is dedicated to Faurecia’s Historhy Next project. Faurecia’s plant in Allenjoie will produce over 100.000 tanks per year, start of production will be in 2024.

In addition, fuel cell supplier Symbio, a joint venture between Faurecia and Michelin, is also among the 10 projects supported by the French government in IPCEI (Important Project of Common European Interest), which has dedicated EUR 2.1bn to support the hydrogen industry in France.

A large-scale transformation project, Hymotive will accelerate the mass production of its latest-generation fuel cell systems in Saint-Fons.

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Ohmium inks 120 MW electrolyzer deal with NovoHydrogen

The electrolyzers will provide 120 MW of green hydrogen capacity to an IPP to run through a natural gas plant in New Jersey.

California-based Ohmium International has finalized an agreement to provide Colorado-based NovoHydrogen with PEM Electrolyzers, according to a press release.

The electrolyzers will be used to provide 120 MW of green hydrogen capacity to an independent power producer to run at a natural gas peaking power plant in New Jersey.

Ohmium manufactures standardized interlocking modular PEM electrolyzers that produce pressurized high-purity hydrogen.

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Strata Clean Energy launches P2X platform

Strata’s initial projects will produce ammonia derived from renewable energy, while future projects will focus on alternative e-fuels.

Strata Clean Energy, a renewable energy developer, is building a Power-to-X (P2X) development and technology platform to decarbonize segments of the modern economy where direct electrification is not viable, according to a news release.

The P2X platform leverages the firm’s state-of-the-art, hourly-matched, renewable energy supply solutions to produce low-carbon hydrogen derivatives (ammonia, e-methane, and SAF) critical to the hardest-to-abate industrial, agricultural, and ocean freight and aviation markets.

“Strata will transform non-dispatchable clean energy into carbon-free alternatives for the modern industrial economy. Our structured power products and merchant BESS development track record underpin our differentiated approach to serving large loads which require hourly matched renewable energy supply,” said Mike Grunow, EVP & general manager, P2X, Strata Clean Energy. “For the past 12 months, we have been actively siting projects in ideal locations for logistics, water rights, permitting, energy cost, and grid interconnection. Our team is quickly advancing site engineering with Tier 1 partners, and we are accelerating talks with long-term buyers of the low-carbon intensity commodities. We are going to make this a reality.”

Strata’s initial projects will produce ammonia derived from renewable energy, while future projects will focus on alternative e-fuels that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions where no other alternative exists. As a 1:1 replacement for natural-gas-derived ammonia, low-carbon-intensity ammonia can be the workhorse of the zero-carbon economy as it lowers the shipment cost of green hydrogen by a factor of 30.

“For the past 15 years, Strata has been instrumental in bringing over 270 utility-scale solar and storage projects online,” commented Markus Wilhelm, Strata’s CEO. “In the coming decade, regional grids will be loaded with unscheduled wind and solar. Converting a fraction of this generation into zero-carbon, alternative fuels is the next step in the global energy transition to a net-zero future.”

In the fourth quarter of 2022, Strata P2X began recruiting a dedicated team of experts from the petrochemical and utility sectors to play critical roles in advancing the company’s ambitious goals. Among the new hires is KJ Plank, Chief Innovation Officer, who is building out the technology, engineering, energy, and procurement teams within P2X at Strata.

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Former Denbury executive targeting growth through CCS at industrial emitters

Tracy Evans, a former COO of Denbury Resources, has launched a business unit aimed at offering carbon capture and sequestration services for existing industrial emitters.

CapturePoint, a Texas-based carbon capture and enhanced oil recovery specialist, is seeking to grow by offering carbon capture services to existing industrial emitters.

The company, started with an initial focus on enhanced oil recovery operations using CO2, has launched a subsidiary called CapturePoint Solutions to capitalize on growing demand for carbon capture services at industrial plants, CEO Tracy Evans said in an interview.

Evans, a former chief operating officer of Denbury Resources, has years of experience operating CO2 capture units, pipelines, and oil wells. “The only difference between EOR utilization and sequestration is going to the saline aquifers,” he said of the pivot.

The company’s primary focus is on existing emissions, Evans said, emphasizing the immediate opportunity over proposed plants that might take many years to build. He added that the company would target “pure” sources of CO2 versus diluted sources.

Evans brought in a JV equity partner for the CCS business, but declined to name them. He said the company is sufficiently capitalized for now but might need to raise additional equity as it signs up new projects in the next 12 to 16 months.

Tax equity and CCS

CapturePoint recently completed a tax equity deal for a CCS facility that has been operational since 2013, thanks to changes to provisions governing the use of 45Q for carbon capture that allowed existing plants to qualify if they capture over 500,000 tons of CO2.

The deal, at CVR Partners’ Coffeyville fertilizer plant, opened up an initial payment of $18m and includes installment payments, payable quarterly until March 31, 2030, totaling up to approximately $22m.

An ethanol facility where CapturePoint operates will also qualify for 45Q benefits because 80% or more of the carbon capture unit is being rebuilt, Evans said. The company was able to finance the new construction at the ethanol facility from cash flow out of its oil & gas operations.

Going forward, new projects installed at existing emitters will follow a project finance model, with equity, debt, and 45Q investors, Evans said. The company will use a financial advisor when the time is right, the executive noted, but said there’s more work to be done on sizing and costs before an advisor is lined up.

“The capture costs are similar for each site,” he said. “The pipeline distances to a sequestration site is what drives significant variation in total capital costs.”

Evans believes that tax credit increases in the Inflation Reduction Act – from $35 per ton to $60 per ton for CO2 used in EOR, and $50 per ton to $85 for CO2 sequestration – should help the CCS market evolve and lead to additional deals.

“There wasn’t much in it for the emitter at $35 and $50, to be honest,” he said, “whereas at $60 and $85 there’s something in it for the emitter.”

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Exclusive: Wisconsin RNG portfolio for sale with large renewables portfolio

A major Canadian utility is auctioning off four Wisconsin RNG assets as part of a larger renewables selldown. The subsidiary at auction has previously indicated that it would take part in Northeastern US hydrogen development.

Algonquin Power & Utilities is selling a package of four renewable natural gas assets, totaling 532 mmbtu, in Wisconsin as part of a larger renewables auction, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

JP Morgan is advising on the process, codenamed Project Power, the sources said.

The process comprises mostly operational onshore wind (2,325 MW) and solar (670 MW), along with an 8 GW development pipeline across 10 power markets, according to a teaser seen by ReSource. The renewable assets are collectively known as Liberty under the Algonquin banner.

The pipeline includes 1,600 mmbtu of RNG. The operational RNG assets reached COD in 2022.

Algonquin did not respond to requests for comment. JP Morgan declined comment.

The Wisconsin assets are apparently the former Sandhill Advanced Biofuels projects, which were acquired by Algonquin in 2022.

When that acquisition was made, it was announced that Liberty had signed on as a “hydrogen ecosystem partner” in the multi-state Northeast Regional Clean Hydrogen Hub. That hub ultimately was not selected by the US department of Energy for hub funding.

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Exclusive: Emissions reduction technology firm in Series A capital raise

A technology start-up that uses plasma to reduce emissions from natural gas and methane flaring is seeking an additional $15m to top off its Series A capital raise. One of its principal products converts natural gas into hydrogen and usable graphene with no CO2 emissions.

Rimere, a climate solutions company with proprietary plasma technology, is seeking to raise an additional $15m as part of its ongoing Series A capital raise.

The start-up recently announced an anchor investment of $10m from Clean Energy Fuels Corp, a publicly listed renewable natural gas firm, and is pursuing further investments from strategics and financial players, with an eye on closing the round in 2Q24, CEO Mitchell Pratt said in an interview.

The company is not currently working with a financial advisor on the Series A capital raise, Pratt said. Its legal counsel is Morrison Foerster.

The anchor investment along with additional funds raised will allow Rimere to advance development and field testing of its two principal products, the Reformer and the Mitigator. 

The Mitigator is a plasma thermal oxidizer that reduces the greenhouse gas potency of small-scale fugitive methane emissions, while the Reformer transforms natural gas into clean hydrogen and usable graphene without creating any CO2 emissions.

The products are meant to work in tandem to decarbonize natural gas infrastructure and deliver cleaner gas to end users in transportation, power generation, and industry.

“We believe that, overall, what the technology does is revalue natural gas reserves and the long-term viability of natural gas for global future energy,” Pratt said.

Commercial strategy

Rimere will develop a commercial strategy throughout the course of this year for the Mitigator, and plans to deploy the product in the beginning of next year.

“We have quite a bit of interest for this as a solution because of the low cost of the product and the terrific results,” Pratt said, noting that the Mitigator removes CO2 for under $5 per metric ton.

In contrast, the Inflation Reduction Act passed in 2022 introduced the Methane Emissions Reduction Program, a charge on methane emitted by oil and gas companies that report emissions under the Clean Air Act. The charge starts at $900 per metric ton of methane for calendar year 2024, increasing to $1,500 for 2026 and beyond.

To be sure, the Mitigator, as a thermal oxidizer, transforms methane, which is a much more potent greenhouse gas, into hydrogen, water, and CO2 for a net reduction of the global warming impact of 200 metric tons a year of CO2.

The Reformer, a container-style unit, is being scaled up to produce 50 kg per day of hydrogen from natural gas along with 150 kg of graphene, a marketable nano carbon where the CO2 is captured. Graphene is used in batteries, composites, medical devices, and concrete to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, among other applications.

Rimere plans to increase the scale of the Reformer to between 400 – 600 kg per day and raise additional funds next year, Pratt said. The amount of funds needed for that is not yet known, he said.

Pratt envisions an application for hydrogen blending using the two products.

“We see it as a way to decentralize hydrogen production, taking advantage of a cleaner natural gas infrastructure, because we’ve applied the Mitigator to cleaning up those fugitive methane emissions that are occurring in the normal operations of equipment,” Pratt said.

For example, Rimere can tap into a natural gas pipeline, take a slipstream of gas, extract the valuable graphene, and then re-inject hydrogen and natural gas back into the pipeline.

Additionally, the blending application can be positioned at an end-use customer’s facility, allowing the Reformer to start blending hydrogen into the gas stream, going into boilers and burners and reducing the CO2 emissions more effectively and immediately, Pratt said.

$1 per kg

Taking the average cost of delivered natural gas and power to industrial users, the company can already produce hydrogen at $1 per kilogram, Pratt said.

For every four kilograms of end-use product – one being hydrogen, the other three graphene – the energy cost allows hydrogen to be produced at or below $1 per kg.

“The last 12 months of running is less than a dollar,” he said, emphasizing that the graphene production is not subsidizing the hydrogen.

“Although the value of graphene could make hydrogen a throwaway fuel.”

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